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      Automatic Detection of User Abilities through the SmartAbility Framework

      proceedings-article

      1 , 1 , 1 , 1

      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Accelerometer, Assistive Technologies, Disabilities, Gyroscope, People with reduced physical abilities, Sensor Technologies, Smartphone, User Interaction

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          Abstract

          This paper presents a proposed smartphone application for the unique SmartAbility Framework that supports interaction with technology for people with reduced physical ability, through focusing on the actions that they can perform independently. The Framework is a culmination of knowledge obtained through previously conducted technology feasibility trials and controlled usability evaluations involving the user community. The Framework is an example of ability-based design that focuses on the abilities of users instead of their disabilities. The paper includes a summary of Versions 1 and 2 of the Framework, including the results of a two-phased validation approach, conducted at the UK Mobility Roadshow and via a focus group of domain experts. A holistic model developed by adapting the House of Quality (HoQ) matrix of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) approach is also described. A systematic literature review of sensor technologies built into smart devices establishes the capabilities of sensors in the Android and iOS operating systems. The review defines a set of inclusion and exclusion criteria, as well as search terms used to elicit literature from online repositories. The key contribution is the mapping of ability-based sensor technologies onto the Framework, to enable the future implementation of a smartphone application. Through the exploitation of the SmartAbility application, the Framework will increase technology amongst people with reduced physical ability and provide a promotional tool for assistive technology manufacturers.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Use of The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a conceptual framework and common language for disability statistics and health information systems

          A common framework for describing functional status information is needed in order to make this information comparable and of value. The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which has been approved by all its member states, provides this common language and framework. The article provides an overview of ICF taxonomy, introduces the conceptual model which underpins ICF and elaborates on how ICF is used at population and clinical level. Furthermore, the article presents key features of the ICF tooling environment and outlines current and future developments of the classification.
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            Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living.

            We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants.
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              An analysis of functional shoulder movements during task performance using Dartfish movement analysis software

              Purpose: Video-based movement analysis software (Dartfish) has potential for clinical applications for understanding shoulder motion if functional measures can be reliably obtained. The primary purpose of this study was to describe the functional range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder used to perform a subset of functional tasks. A second purpose was to assess the reliability of functional ROM measurements obtained by different raters using Dartfish software. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy participants, mean age 29 ± 5 years, were videotaped while performing five tasks selected from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). Video cameras and markers were used to obtain video images suitable for analysis in Dartfish software. Three repetitions of each task were performed. Shoulder movements from all three repetitions were analyzed using Dartfish software. The tracking tool of the Dartfish software was used to obtain shoulder joint angles and arcs of motion. Test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the measurements were evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results: Maximum (coronal plane) abduction (118° ± 16°) and (sagittal plane) flexion (111° ± 15°) was observed during ‘washing one's hair;’ maximum extension (−68° ± 9°) was identified during ‘washing one's own back.’ Minimum shoulder ROM was observed during ‘opening a tight jar’ (33° ± 13° abduction and 13° ± 19° flexion). Test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.45 to 0.94) suggests high inter-individual task variability, and inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.68 to 1.00) showed moderate to excellent agreement. Conclusion: Key findings include: 1) functional shoulder ROM identified in this study compared to similar studies; 2) healthy individuals require less than full ROM when performing five common ADL tasks 3) high participant variability was observed during performance of the five ADL tasks; and 4) Dartfish software provides a clinically relevant tool to analyze shoulder function.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-11
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Faculty of Science & Technology, Bournemouth University

                Talbot Campus, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset, BH12 5BB, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.43
                © Whittington et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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