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Artificial Intelligence for Long-term Respiratory Disease Management

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Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

Human Computer Interaction Conference

4 - 6 July 2018

Artificial Intelligence, Disease management, Machine learning, Respiratory, SWOT

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      Abstract

      This paper presents the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for Artificial Intelligence (AI) as applied to long-term respiratory disease management. This analysis will help to identify, understand, and evaluate key aspects of the technology as well as the various internal/external forces which influence its success in this application space. Such understanding is instrumental to ensure judicial planning and implementation with suitable safeguards being considered. AI has the potential to radically change how respiratory disease management is conducted and may help clinicians to realise new treatment paradigms. The application of AI is clearly not specific to respiratory disease management; however it is a chronic disease that requires on-going monitoring and well evidenced decision making regarding treatment pathways or medication modification. This work emphasises the current position of AI as applied to respiratory disease management and identifies the issues to help develop strategic directions to ensure successful implementation, evidenced by ubiquitous acceptance and uptake.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            School of Engineering

            Ulster University

            Shore Rd., N’abbey

            Co.Antrim, BT370QB
            Sch. of Computing & Mathematics

            Ulster University

            Shore Rd., N’abbey

            Co.Antrim, BT370QB
            Contributors
            Conference
            July 2018
            July 2018
            : 1-5
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.65
            © Catherwood et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
            HCI
            32
            Belfast, UK
            4 - 6 July 2018
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Human Computer Interaction Conference
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

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