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      A preliminary study of semantics elicited by haptic stimulation of buttons by shape and haptic texture by using a single-key handheld device

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      button, feedback, haptic, emotional dimension

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          Abstract

          Effective designs compel customers to purchase products. Adding extra value to products by characterizing users’ experiences can lead firms to greater market success. Haptic stimulation can be added to products to enhance product performance and consumer satisfaction. Handheld products not only integrate sensors, such as pressure sensors and fingerprint scanners, into their buttons but also feature materials, shapes, and physical feedback, all of which enrich users’ haptic experience. In contrast to other sensory modalities, haptic sensors can detect various information types, such as pressure, weight, shape, and temperature, which are typically input in a single action. Products may induce various emotional responses depending on their shape and haptic feedback capabilities. Most studies have focused on the visual consistency of stimuli, but not semantic interference, between haptic modalities. This study investigated the relationship between the product semantic and affective response through cross-modal stimulation of button design. The results indicate that buttons with convex features result in high levels of arousal but low levels of valence, whereas buttons with an engraved square line result in the highest levels of valence. In the future, the event-related potential method will be used to test this study’s applicability.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Core affect and the psychological construction of emotion.

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            Dimensions in appreciation of car interior design

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              Emotional valence modulates the preference for curved objects.

              Previous studies have shown that people prefer objects with curved contours over objects with sharp contours. However, those studies used stimuli that were mainly neutral in emotional valence. We tested here the interplay between visual features and general valence as positive or negative. After replicating curvature preferences for neutral objects, we used positive (cake, chocolate) and negative (snake, bomb) stimuli to examine if emotional valence-through response prioritisation-modulates the preference for curved objects. We found that people indeed preferred the curved versions of objects to the sharp versions of the same objects, but only if the objects were neutral or positive in emotional valence. There were no difference in liking for objects with negative emotional valence. This is evidence that the aesthetic response is adaptive, in this case prioritising valence over contour as demanded by the general semantic classification.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-5
                Affiliations
                Department of Industrial Design, Tatung University

                No. 40, Sec. 3, ZhongShan N. Rd., Taipei City, 104, Taiwan R.O.C.
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.92
                © Yang et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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