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      The Impact of Device Associations on Human Memory Performance

      Proceedings of the 33rd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (BCS HCI 2020)

      Human Computer Interaction

      6 July 2020

      Human Memory, Cognition, Device Use, Device Stereotypes

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          Abstract

          This project investigates whether associations (or stereotypes) connected to technological devices impact human memory, i.e do people remember more when using one device over another? To do this the project aims to investigate ( 1) the associations made with devices (e.g. utilitarian or hedonic qualities); ( 2) whether these associations impact human memory in controlled settings; and ( 3) if these effects transfer to applied settings. This paper describes the progress made so far in addressing Aim 1 and steps currently being undertaken to address Aim 2. The paper further identifies areas of interest surrounding Aim 3.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Studies of interference in serial verbal reactions.

           J. R. Stroop (1935)
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            Measuring the hedonic and utilitarian sources of consumer attitudes

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              Environmental context-dependent memory: a review and meta-analysis.

              To address questions about human memory's dependence on the coincidental environmental contexts in which events occur, we review studies of incidental environmental context-dependent memory in humans and report a meta-analysis. Our theoretical approach to the issue stems from Glenberg's (1997) contention that introspective thought (e.g., remembering, conceptualizing) requires cognitive resources normally used to represent the immediate environment. We propose that if tasks encourage processing of noncontextual information (i.e., introspective thought) at input and/or at test, then both learning and memory will be less dependent on the ambient environmental contexts in which those activities occur. The meta-analysis showed that across all studies, environmental context effects were reliable, and furthermore, that the use of noncontextual cues during learning (overshadowing) and at test (outshining), as well as mental reinstatement of appropriate context cues at test, all reduce the effect of environmental manipulations. We conclude that environmental context-dependent memory effects are less likely to occur under conditions in which the immediate environment is likely to be suppressed.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2020
                July 2020
                : 34-37
                Affiliations
                Department of Computer Science

                University of Manchester

                Manchester, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI20DC.7
                © Steeds. Published by BCS Learning & Development. Proceedings of the BCS HCI Doctoral Consortium 2020. Keele University, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 33rd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                BCS HCI 2020
                33
                Keele University, UK
                6 July 2020
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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