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      Counter Terrorism: Risk Perception and Communication in Naturalistic Environments

      ,

      9th Bi-annual International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM9) (NDM)

      Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM9)

      23 - 26 June 2009

      Counter terrorism, risk perception, communication, interactive technology

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          Abstract

          Motivation – This research examines risk perception and the process of interactive counter terror communication in order to reduce the fear associated with security technologies in public spaces. Research approach – Using focus groups, data collection will adopt a two-stage design assessing (i) public perceptions of current counter terror communications and (ii) the effectiveness of interactive counter terror communication tools. Research limitations / Implications – Despite limitations associated with the generalisability of findings to other UK cities and countries, it is hoped that this research will produce evidence-based advice on how best to communicate with the UK public. Originality / Value – This research demonstrates the utility of researchers engaging in risk research collaborating with communication designers to develop state-of-the art communication tools. Take away message – When situated in a naturalistic environment, interactive communication tools can be used as an interface to manage the public’s risk perceptions in relation to counter terror technologies.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Emotion Priming and Attributions for Terrorism: Americans' Reactions in a National Field Experiment

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            Evolving judgments of terror risks: foresight, hindsight, and emotion.

            The authors examined the evolution of cognitive and emotional responses to terror risks for a nationally representative sample of Americans between late 2001 and late 2002. Respondents' risk judgments changed in ways consistent with their reported personal experiences. However, they did not recognize these changes, producing hindsight bias in memories for their judgments. An intensive debiasing procedure failed to restore a foresightful perspective. A fear-inducing manipulation increased risk estimates, whereas an anger-inducing manipulation reduced them-both in predictions (as previously observed) and in memories and judgments of past risks. Thus, priming emotions shaped not only perceptions of an abstract future but also perceptions of a concrete past. These results suggest how psychological research can help to ensure an informed public.
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              Mediating the social and psychological impacts of terrorist attacks: the role of risk perception and risk communication.

              The public's understanding of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) related issues and their likely actions following a CBRN incident is an issue of great concern, as public psychological and behavioural responses will help determine subsequent morbidity and mortality rates. This paper explores the role of effective government communication with the public and its role in mediating the social and psychological impact of terrorist attacks. We examine the importance of effective communication in reducing morbidity and mortality in the event of a terrorist attack and explore the impact of risk perceptions in determining the success or failure of risk communication strategies. This includes the examination of the role of fear as a health risk, and the identification of factors relevant to public trust in risk communication. Finally, an investigation of the type of information desired by members of the public leads the authors to make risk communication recommendations targeted at the promotion of more adaptive behaviours in response to CBRN attacks.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                June 2009
                June 2009
                : 251-252
                Affiliations
                London College of Communication, University of the Arts London
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/NDM2009.35
                © Claire McAndrew et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. 9th Bi-annual International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM9), BCS London

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                9th Bi-annual International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM9)
                NDM
                9
                BCS London
                23 - 26 June 2009
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM9)
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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