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      Interferences of the Multitude

      proceedings-article
      , ,
      Proceedings of Politics of the Machines - Rogue Research 2021 (POM 2021)
      debate and devise concepts and practices that seek to critically question and unravel novel modes of science
      September 14-17, 2021
      New materialism, Feminist Theory, Trans-feminist hacking, Arts-based research, Multitude, Potentia
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            Abstract

            Interferences of the Multitude is an introductory analysis of the perspectives collected under the umbrella of the homonymous track, presented during the Rogue Research edition of the 3rd Politics of the Machines Conference in Berlin (September 14–17, 2021). The paper examines the implementation of arts-based research into the new modes of techno-ecofeminist imaginaries and investigates its generative potential for the enactment of the new materialist and feminist ethics of care, collaboration, and solidarity. The projects presented and discussed span the entangled fields of human–computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, material sciences, critical design and making, architecture, machine learning, interactive art, and post-human performance.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Contributors
            Conference
            September 2021
            September 2021
            : 55-62
            Affiliations
            [0001]Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

            Vienna, Austria
            Article
            10.14236/ewic/POM2021.7
            8af52761-9ed2-4fef-b0e0-1d3b8b377286
            © Torosyan et al. Published by BCS Learning & Development Ltd. Proceedings of Politics of the Machines - Rogue Research 2021, Berlin, Germany

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Proceedings of Politics of the Machines - Rogue Research 2021
            POM 2021
            3
            Berlin, Germany
            September 14-17, 2021
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            debate and devise concepts and practices that seek to critically question and unravel novel modes of science
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (article page): https://www.scienceopen.com/hosted-document?doi=10.14236/ewic/POM2021.7
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

            Applied computer science,Computer science,Security & Cryptology,Graphics & Multimedia design,General computer science,Human-computer-interaction
            Multitude,Arts-based research,Trans-feminist hacking,Feminist Theory,New materialism,Potentia

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