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      The Now of History: Tomographic and Ficto-Critical Approaches to Writing About Sonic Art

      RE:SOUND 2019 – 8th International Conference on Media Art, Science, and Technology (RE:SOUND 2019)

      Media Art, Science, and Technology

      August 20-23, 2019

      Sonic art, sound art, sonic art theory, ficto-criticism, fictocriticism, sonic fiction, creative commentary

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Sonic art concerns itself with the experience of listening, a sense perception markedly different to the visual. However the majority of commentary on sonic art utilises historical and taxonomical approaches dependent on theoretical structures that are inherently retinal. Expanding on Salomé Voegelin’s proposal for a writing that stems from a ‘sonic sensibility’ (2010, 2014) this paper proposes a tomographic (as opposed to a topographic) approach, one that is generated from the embedded and embodied nature of the sonic experience. It is proposed that this tomographic subjectivity forms part of a ficto-critical writing methodology, in which creative and critical modes are intermingled. Ficto-criticism allows for an interplay of percept and concept that is proposed as a suitable match for sonic art in which these similar tensions play out. A number of texts by writers identified as using tomographic and ficto-critical strategies will be used to illustrate this approach including Daniela Cascella, Kodwo Eshun and Joanna Demers. This paper reflects the first stage of doctoral research that will continue, by analysis and enaction, to develop a legitimate place for fictocritical writing as a rigorous contribution to cultural commentary about sonic art.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Perceptual symbol systems.

          Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statistics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement recording systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, association areas in the brain capture bottom-up patterns of activation in sensory-motor areas. Later, in a top-down manner, association areas partially reactivate sensory-motor areas to implement perceptual symbols. The storage and reactivation of perceptual symbols operates at the level of perceptual components--not at the level of holistic perceptual experiences. Through the use of selective attention, schematic representations of perceptual components are extracted from experience and stored in memory (e.g., individual memories of green, purr, hot). As memories of the same component become organized around a common frame, they implement a simulator that produces limitless simulations of the component (e.g., simulations of purr). Not only do such simulators develop for aspects of sensory experience, they also develop for aspects of proprioception (e.g., lift, run) and introspection (e.g., compare, memory, happy, hungry). Once established, these simulators implement a basic conceptual system that represents types, supports categorization, and produces categorical inferences. These simulators further support productivity, propositions, and abstract concepts, thereby implementing a fully functional conceptual system. Productivity results from integrating simulators combinatorially and recursively to produce complex simulations. Propositions result from binding simulators to perceived individuals to represent type-token relations. Abstract concepts are grounded in complex simulations of combined physical and introspective events. Thus, a perceptual theory of knowledge can implement a fully functional conceptual system while avoiding problems associated with amodal symbol systems. Implications for cognition, neuroscience, evolution, development, and artificial intelligence are explored.
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            The Fall: Fictocritical Writing

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              Writing and the flesh of others

               A. Gibbs (2003)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                August 2019
                August 2019
                : 57-62
                Affiliations
                University of Technology Sydney (PhD Candidate)

                38 Cascade St, Katoomba, NSW Australia 2780
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/RESOUND19.9
                © Priest. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of RE:SOUND 2019

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                RE:SOUND 2019 – 8th International Conference on Media Art, Science, and Technology
                RE:SOUND 2019
                8
                Aalborg, Denmark
                August 20-23, 2019
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Media Art, Science, and Technology
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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