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      A Population Approach to Ubicomp System Design

      ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010 (VOCS)

      ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010

      14 - 16 April 2010

      Ubiquitous computing, socio-technical design processes, software adaptation, ontology, type theory

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          Abstract

          In this paper we propose a new approach to the design of ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) systems. One of ubicomp’s design ideals is systems that adapt so as to maintain contextual fit. However, the contexts and uses of ubicomp systems are varied and changing, which makes achieving this ideal challenging—especially when using traditional design approaches grounded in static definitions of types or classes, i.e. in static computational structures. Here we outline an alternative approach to system design, a ‘vision’ for ubiquitous computing, which relies on dynamically coupling together several complementary representations of class. One of these is a population of instances, each of which may differ in its structure, context and use. We offer examples of tools and analyses that set these representations within an ongoing socio-technical process that, we propose, offers significant potential for satisfying ubicomp’s requirement for adapting system structure so as to sustain contextual fit.

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          Most cited references 9

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          Survey of clustering algorithms.

           Rui Xu,  Donald Wunsch (2005)
          Data analysis plays an indispensable role for understanding various phenomena. Cluster analysis, primitive exploration with little or no prior knowledge, consists of research developed across a wide variety of communities. The diversity, on one hand, equips us with many tools. On the other hand, the profusion of options causes confusion. We survey clustering algorithms for data sets appearing in statistics, computer science, and machine learning, and illustrate their applications in some benchmark data sets, the traveling salesman problem, and bioinformatics, a new field attracting intensive efforts. Several tightly related topics, proximity measure, and cluster validation, are also discussed.
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            Evolving grounded communication for robots.

             Luc Steels (2003)
            The computational and robotic synthesis of language evolution is emerging as a new exciting field of research. The objective is to come up with precise operational models of how communities of agents, equipped with a cognitive apparatus, a sensori-motor system, and a body, can arrive at shared grounded communication systems. Such systems may have similar characteristics to animal communication or human language. Apart from its technological interest in building novel applications in the domain of human-robot or robot-robot interaction, this research is of interest to the many disciplines concerned with the origins and evolution of language and communication.
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              Self-adaptive software

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                April 2010
                April 2010
                : 1-12
                Affiliations
                Computing Science, University of Glasgow

                Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/VOCS2010.1
                © Matthew Chalmers. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010, The University of Edinburgh

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010
                VOCS
                The University of Edinburgh
                14 - 16 April 2010
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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