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      Representing Altered States of Consciousness in Computer Arts

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2015) (EVA)

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

      7 & 9 July 2015

      Altered states of consciousness, Psychedelic art, Visual music, Computer arts, Immersive technologies

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          It has been proposed that among the earliest known artworks produced by humans may have been representations of altered states of consciousness (ASCs). With the advent of modern computer technology that enables the creation of almost any sound or image imaginable, the possibility of representing the subjective visual and aural components of hallucinatory experiences with increased realism emerges. In order to consider how these representations could be created, this paper provides a discussion of existing work that represents ASCs. I commence by providing an overview of ASCs and a brief history of their use in culture. This provides the necessary background through which we may then consider the variety of art and music that represents ASCs, including: shamanic art and music, modern visual art, popular music, film and video games. Through discussion of the ways in which these examples represent ASC, a concept of ‘ASC Simulation’ is proposed, which emphasises realistic representations of ASCs. The paper concludes with a brief summary of several creative projects in computer music and arts that explore this area.

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          Most cited references 13

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          A selective review of selective attention research from the past century.

           Jon Driver (2001)
          Research on attention is concerned with selective processing of incoming sensory information. To some extent, our awareness of the world depends on what we choose to attend, not merely on the stimulation entering our senses. British psychologists have made substantial contributions to this topic in the past century. Celebrated examples include Donald Broadbent's filter theory of attention, which set the agenda for most subsequent work; and Anne Treisman's revisions of this account, and her later feature-integration theory. More recent contributions include Alan Allport's prescient emphasis on the relevance of neuroscience data, and John Duncan's integration of such data with psychological theory. An idiosyncratic but roughly chronological review of developments is presented, some practical and clinical implications are briefly sketched, and future directions suggested. One of the biggest changes in the field has been the increasing interplay between psychology and neuroscience, which promises much for the future. A related change has been the realization that selection attention is best thought of as a broad topic, encompassing a range of selective issues, rather than as a single explanatory process.
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            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A selective review of selective attention research from the past century.

             Jon Driver (2001)
            Research on attention is concerned with selective processing of incoming sensory information. To some extent, our awareness of the world depends on what we choose to attend, not merely on the stimulation entering our senses. British psychologists have made substantial contributions to this topic in the past century. Celebrated examples include Donald Broadbent's filter theory of attention, which set the agenda for most subsequent work; and Anne Treisman's revisions of this account, and her later feature-integration theory. More recent contributions include Alan Allport's prescient emphasis on the relevance of neuroscience data, and John Duncan's integration of such data with psychological theory. An idiosyncratic but roughly chronological review of developments is presented, some practical and clinical implications are briefly sketched, and future directions suggested. One of the biggest changes in the field has been the increasing interplay between psychology and neuroscience, which promises much for the future. A related change has been the realization that selection attention is best thought of as a broad topic, encompassing a range of selective issues, rather than as a single explanatory process.
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              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Sound through the rabbit hole: sound design based on reports of auditory hallucination

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2015
                July 2015
                : 80-87
                Affiliations
                Glyndŵr University Plas Coch Campus, Mold Road, Wrexham, LL112AW North Wales, UK

                j.weinel@glyndwr.ac.uk
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/eva2015.9
                © Kelly Hamilton Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2015, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2015)
                EVA
                London, UK
                7 & 9 July 2015
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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