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      PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE FOR ADVERSE EVENTS FOLLOWING COVID-19 VACCINATION IN AFRICA : Rare Adverse Events and Fatal Cases Following COVID-19 Vaccination in Africa

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            Abstract

            Background: The death toll and economic disaster caused by SARS-CoV-2/ COVID-19 is still on the rise globally and in Africa with a case fatality ratio (CFR), 2.58 from 220,958 deaths out of 8,556,890 cases recorded across the continent as of 14th November 2021. Local, national and international health agencies have advocated multi-pronged public health strategies to limit infections and prevent deaths. The availability of a safe and effective vaccine is critical in the control of a pandemic. Several adverse events have been reported globally for different vaccines including COVID-19 with limited or no data from Africa.

            Methods: This cross-sectional epidemiological study investigated the adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination in Africans between April- June, 2021 using a structured questionnaire distributed via the web for public health surveillance.

            Results: Out of the 1200 participants recruited, a total of 80.8% (n = 969) respondents from 35 countries including 22 African countries and 13 countries where Africans live in the diaspora reported different adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination. More than half of the vaccinee were male (53.0%) and frontline healthcare workers (55.7%), respectively. A total of 15.6% (n = 151) reported previous exposure to SARS-CoV-2 while about one-fourth, 24.8% (n = 240) reported different underlying health conditions prior to vaccination. Fatal cases were 5.1% (n = 49) while other significant heterogenous events were reported in three categories: very common, common, and uncommon adverse events including enlarged lymph nodes 2.4% (n = 23), menstrual disorder 0.5% (n = 5), and increased libido 0.2% (n = 2).

            Conclusions: The study provided useful data for concerned authorities and institutions to prepare plans that will address issues related to COVID-19 vaccines.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Journal
            AfricArXiv Preprints
            ScienceOpen
            27 January 2022
            Affiliations
            [1 ] Department of Microbiology (Virology Research), Lagos State University
            [2 ] Department of Veterinary Public Health & Preventive Medicine, University of Ilorin, Nigeria
            [3 ] Department of Pharmacy, University of Rwanda
            [4 ] Tours University, Egypt
            [5 ] Training and Research Unit, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana
            [6 ] Department of Microbiology (Virology Research), Lagos State University, Nigeria
            [7 ] Harvard University, Boston MA, United States of America
            [8 ] Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
            [9 ] Department of Nephrology and Hemodialysis Center, Bahre Teaching Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
            [10 ] Biological Engineering Laboratory, Sultan Moulay Slimane University Beni Mellal, Morocco
            [11 ] Mogadishu Somali Turkish Education and Research Hospital
            [12 ] Department of Infection Control, Al Jawad Hospital, Sudan
            [13 ] Lagos State Ministry of Health
            [14 ] Pharmacovigilance and Safety Monitoring, Rwanda Food and Drugs Authority, Rwanda.
            [15 ] Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha campus Eastern Cape South Africa and Department of Biochemistry, Lagos State University.
            [16 ] Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan and Director General, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Nigeria.
            [17 ] Department of Veterinary Public Health & Preventive Medicine, University of Ilorin and Chairperson, Kwara State COVID-19 Technical Working Group, Nigeria.
            [18 ] Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine & Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.
            [19 ] Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD), Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO), Tanzania and University of Pretoria, South Africa
            [20 ] Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Ahram Canadian University and Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt.
            Author notes
            Article
            10.14293/111.000/000024.v1
            447151cb-fba9-45a6-8276-479cfd10343b

            This work has been published open access under Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0 , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Conditions, terms of use and publishing policy can be found at www.scienceopen.com .

            Funding
            Non NA

            All data generated or analysed during this study are included in this published article (and its supplementary information files).
            Medicine,Life sciences
            Keywords: Vaccine adverse events,SARS-CoV-2,COVID-19 vaccine,Public health,Vaccination,Adverse events following immunization (AEFI)

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