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Social Pedagogy and School Community Preventing Bullying in Schools and Dealing with Diversity: Two Sides of the Same Coin

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      Abstract

      This paper presents a social pedagogical research programme that has been carried out during the years of economic crisis in Greece. It focuses on preventing bullying in schools, primarily by dealing with personal beliefs about diversity as well as by expanding and strengthening emotional, communication and social skills. What may differentiate this social pedagogical programme from others on bullying in schools is that it holds that positively dealing with diversity/otherness is important in preventing bullying, and that the programme is systemic in nature; that is, it utilises multiple possibilities arising from the transdisciplinary synergy of social pedagogy and systems science and is inspired by an emerging common philosophical and epistemological perception, integration of principles, methods and practices to be derived from the combined operation, at a higher level, of the two sciences.

      This programme brings together: those involved directly or indirectly with the school and the wider community; all those who seek to create a powerful and consistent communications network to establish, strengthen, and eventually be inspired by what we call the ‘social pedagogical ethos’, which will shape and establish a new ‘social pedagogical culture’.

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      The forms of capital

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        The Art of Being a Social Pedagogue: Developing Cultural Change in Children’s Homes in Essex

         Gabriel Eichsteller (corresponding) ,  Sylvia Holthoff (2012)
        As one of the first organisations in the UK to pioneer social pedagogy within its residential service, Essex County Council began working together with ThemPra Social Pedagogy in September 2008. This article describes some of the ways in which social pedagogy influenced the culture and practice in the local authority’s children’s homes. In contrast to other evaluations, most notably Berridge and colleague’s (2011) evaluation of the English government’s social pedagogy pilot project, this paper draws on narrative material gathered over the 3-year project in order to provide insights into attitudinal changes amongst staff teams, to highlight how practitioners developed their understanding of social pedagogy and to offer examples of how teams improved their practice and culture throughout the project. By describing social pedagogic practice as an art form we aim to outline the holistic, dynamic and process-orientated nature of social pedagogy that distinguishes it from the procedurally driven, outcome-focussed practice which has been heralded by new managerialism ( Petrie et al., 2006 ; Smith, 2009 ). An abridged version of our full project report ( Eichsteller & Holthoff, 2012 ), the article focuses on four areas relating to the art of being a social pedagogue: Haltung, relationships, reflection, and culture.
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          Social pedagogy and the teacher: England and Norway compared

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
            Author notes
            Correspondence to: Iro Mylonakou-Keke, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Education, Pedagogical Faculty of Primary Education, 13A Navarinou, 10680 Athens, Greece. E - mail: imylon@ 123456primedu.uoa.gr

            *Iro Mylonakou-Keke is Associate Professor of Social Pedagogy in the Pedagogical Faculty of Primary Education in the School of Education at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece. Her academic interests include theoretical, epistemological and methodological dimensions of social pedagogy and the exploration of various social pedagogical issues, such as efficient communication between school, family and community, the Syneducation (synergy + education) Model, creativity development, highlighting otherness and the uniqueness of every human being and addressing antisocial behaviour in the school environment. She has been coordinating and conducting several research programmes dealing with various social pedagogical issues that emphasise the broad field of application and complex dynamics of social pedagogy, on which she has published twelve books (in Greek) and a number of articles. She has initiated and coordinates the first Master’s programme in social pedagogy in Greece, entitled: ‘Social Neurosciences, Social Pedagogy and Education’.

            Journal
            ijsp
            ijsp
            International Journal of Social Pedagogy
            IJSP
            UCL Press (UK )
            2051-5804
            1 January 2015
            : 4
            : 1
            : 65-84
            10.14324/111.444.ijsp.2015.v4.1.006
            Copyright © 2015 The Author(s). [Special issue title, Social Pedagogy in Times of Crisis in Greece]

            This work is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-NC-SA) 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/, which permits re-use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided any modifications of this material in anyway is distributed under this same license, is not used for commercial purposes, and the original author and source are credited

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            Figures: 0, Tables: 1, Equations: 0, References: 50, Pages: 21

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