Blog
About

78
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Settler Salvation and Indigenous Survival: George Copway’s Reconciliatory Vision, 1849–1851

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          From 1849 to 1851, Canada’s first international literary celebrity, the Mississauga writer Kahgegagahbowh, or George Copway, travelled the United States, Great Britain and Europe promoting his vision for the future of Indigenous peoples in the United States. Building on a theological critique of settler colonialism, he called for the creation of a new Indigenous territory west of the Mississippi led by a legislature made up of English-speaking Indigenous Christians. Copway believed that through the establishment of this territory he called Kahgega, European settlers would be able to atone for the sins committed against Indigenous North Americans, thus escaping the impending wrath of God. More importantly, believing that Indigenous peoples faced imminent extinction, he saw Kahgega as a permanent means of preserving his people and safeguarding their shrinking lands and political agency. Though Kahgega failed to impress the public, Copway’s vision offers a fascinating window into an early attempt at reconciling the Indigenous and non-Indigenous halves of North American society. Using the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s definition of ‘reconciliation’, this article shows that past, often failed, Indigenous political visions reveal the complexities and tensions inherent in dialogue surrounding reconciliation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 17

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Life, Letters, and Speeches

           George Copway (1997)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Book: not found

            The Ojibwa of Southern Ontario

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Pastoral Landscape with Indians: George Copway and the Political Unconscious of the American Pastoral

               Timothy Sweet (1993)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                ljcs
                ljcs
                London Journal of Canadian Studies
                UCL Press
                2397-0928
                0267-2200
                30 November 2020
                : 35
                : 1
                : 138-153
                Affiliations
                1University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Email: john.bird@ 123456usask.ca
                Article
                10.14324/111.444.ljcs.2020v35.007
                Copyright © 2020, John R.E. Bird

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY) 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, References: 17, Pages: 17
                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                London Journal of Canadian Studies
                Volume 35, Issue 1

                Similar content 88

                Most referenced authors 11