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      'I AM THE MOTHER AND THE FATHER' - WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION IN CUBA AND THE UK

      research-article
      International Journal of Cuban Studies
      Pluto Journals
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            Abstract

            Construction ranks as one of the most gender segregated sectors worldwide, whilst gender diversity is now considered a success factor in economic growth and social welfare. The aim of this article is to evaluate the progress made by women in Cuba in making inroads into this male-dominated work sector, building on theoretical perspectives in relation to working in construction and women's gender roles which have been developed in both Cuba and the UK. Drawing on interviews with Cuban women in construction, it seeks to find answers to the questions of why women should choose to go to work in this environment despite the barriers, whether there are good reasons for society needing them to do this kind of work and what conditions need to be put in place in order to make this possible. These questions are evaluated in relation to the triple burden of paid work, combating exclusion, and unpaid work in the home; and conclusions are drawn for future study.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Journal
            intejcubastud
            10.2307/j50005551
            International Journal of Cuban Studies
            Pluto Journals
            17563461
            1 April 2010
            1 July 2010
            : 2
            : 1/2
            : 147-156
            Article
            10.2307/41945890
            df78a1db-1134-482d-84aa-58230ae04c16
            © INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF CUBA

            All content is freely available without charge to users or their institutions. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal without asking prior permission of the publisher or the author. Articles published in the journal are distributed under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

            Categories
            Reports from Cuba: Women and the Cuban Revolution

            Literary studies,Arts,Social & Behavioral Sciences,History,Cultural studies,Economics

            References

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