0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Book Chapter: not found
      Oogenesis 

      Origin, Migration, and Proliferation of Human Primordial Germ Cells

      other

      Springer London

      Read this book at

      Buy book Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this book yet. Authors can add summaries to their books on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 105

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Derivation of pluripotent stem cells from cultured human primordial germ cells.

          Human pluripotent stem cells would be invaluable for in vitro studies of aspects of human embryogenesis. With the goal of establishing pluripotent stem cell lines, gonadal ridges and mesenteries containing primordial germ cells (PGCs, 5-9 weeks postfertilization) were cultured on mouse STO fibroblast feeder layers in the presence of human recombinant leukemia inhibitory factor, human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor, and forskolin. Initially, single PGCs in culture were visualized by alkaline phosphatase activity staining. Over a period of 7-21 days, PGCs gave rise to large multicellular colonies resembling those of mouse pluripotent stem cells termed embryonic stem and embryonic germ (EG) cells. Throughout the culture period most cells within the colonies continued to be alkaline phosphatase-positive and tested positive against a panel of five immunological markers (SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81) that have been used routinely to characterize embryonic stem and EG cells. The cultured cells have been continuously passaged and found to be karyotypically normal and stable. Both XX and XY cell cultures have been obtained. Immunohistochemical analysis of embryoid bodies collected from these cultures revealed a wide variety of differentiated cell types, including derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers. Based on their origin and demonstrated properties, these human PGC-derived cultures meet the criteria for pluripotent stem cells and most closely resemble EG cells.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Human DAZL, DAZ and BOULE genes modulate primordial germ cell and haploid gamete formation

            The leading cause of infertility in men and women is quantitative and qualitative defects in human germ cell (oocyte and sperm) development. Yet, it has not been possible to examine the unique developmental genetics of human germ cell formation and differentiation due to inaccessibility of germ cells during fetal development. Although several studies have shown that germ cells can be differentiated from mouse and human embryonic stem cells, human germ cells differentiated in these studies generally did not develop beyond the earliest stages1-8. Here we used a germ cell reporter to quantitate and isolate primordial germ cells derived from both male and female hESCs. Then, by silencing and overexpressing genes that encode germ cell-specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins (not transcription factors), we modulated human germ cell formation and developmental progression. We observed that human DAZL (Deleted in AZoospermia-Like) functions in primordial germ cell formation, whereas closely-related genes, DAZ and BOULE, promote later stages of meiosis and development of haploid gametes. These results are significant to the generation of gametes for future basic science and potential clinical applications.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The Fanconi anaemia/BRCA pathway.

              Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare genetic cancer-susceptibility syndrome that is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone-marrow failure and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Seven FA-associated genes have recently been cloned, and their products were found to interact with well-known DNA-damage-response proteins, including BRCA1, ATM and NBS1. The FA proteins could therefore be involved in the cell-cycle checkpoint and DNA-repair pathways. Recent studies implicate the FA proteins in the process of repairing chromosome defects that occur during homologous recombination, and disruption of the FA genes results in chromosome instability--a common feature of many human cancers.
                Bookmark

                Author and book information

                Book
                978-0-85729-825-6
                978-0-85729-826-3
                2013
                10.1007/978-0-85729-826-3
                Book Chapter
                2013
                October 12 2012
                : 19-37
                10.1007/978-0-85729-826-3_2

                Comments

                Comment on this book