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      Patient priorities in relation to surgery for gastric cancer: qualitative interviews with gastric cancer surgery patients to inform the development of a core outcome set

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          The reporting of outcomes in surgical trials for gastric cancer is inconsistent. The GASTROS study ( GAstric Cancer Surgery TRials Reported Outcome Standardisation) aims to address this by developing a core outcome set (COS) for use in all future trials within this field. A COS should reflect the views of all stakeholders, including patients. We undertook a series of interviews to identify outcomes important to patients which would be considered for inclusion in a COS.

          Setting

          All interviews took place within the UK. Interviews were carried out face-to-face at hospitals and cancer support centres or via the telephone.

          Participants

          Twenty participants at varying stages of recovery following surgery for gastric cancer with curative intent.

          Design

          Qualitative design using semistructured interviews, supported by an interview guide which was iteratively modified; thematic analysis was used to explore patient priorities.

          Results

          Six themes enveloping 38 outcomes were identified; surviving and controlling cancer, technical aspects of surgery, adverse events from surgery, recovering from surgery, long-term problems following surgery and long-term life impact of surgery. The ‘most important’ patient priority was to be ‘cured of cancer’.

          Conclusion

          Surgical trials for gastric cancer should consider broader priorities of patients when choosing which outcomes to report. This study highlighted the importance of longer-term outcomes such as cancer survival. Outcomes identified in this study will be used to inform an international Delphi survey to develop a COS in this field.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Using thematic analysis in psychology

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            A General Inductive Approach for Analyzing Qualitative Evaluation Data

             D R Thomas (2006)
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              Standards for reporting qualitative research: a synthesis of recommendations.

              Standards for reporting exist for many types of quantitative research, but currently none exist for the broad spectrum of qualitative research. The purpose of the present study was to formulate and define standards for reporting qualitative research while preserving the requisite flexibility to accommodate various paradigms, approaches, and methods.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Open
                bmjopen
                bmjopen
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                2044-6055
                2020
                12 February 2020
                : 10
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ] departmentDepartment of Oesophago-Gastric Surgery , Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust , Salford, UK
                [2 ] departmentDivision of Cancer Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health , The University of Manchester , Manchester, UK
                [3 ] departmentCentre for Surgical Research and Bristol NIHR Biomedical Research Centre , University of Bristol , Bristol, UK
                [4 ] departmentPaediatric ENT Department , Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust , Manchester, UK
                [5 ] departmentDivision of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health , University of Manchester , Manchester, United Kingdom
                [6 ] departmentCentre for Primary Care , University of Manchester , Manchester, UK
                Author notes
                [Correspondence to ] Mr Bilal Alkhaffaf; bilal.alkhaffaf@ 123456srft.nhs.uk
                Article
                bmjopen-2019-034782
                10.1136/bmjopen-2019-034782
                7044961
                32051319
                © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ.

                This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to copy, redistribute, remix, transform and build upon this work for any purpose, provided the original work is properly cited, a link to the licence is given, and indication of whether changes were made. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000272, National Institute for Health Research;
                Award ID: DRF-2015-08-023
                Categories
                Surgery
                Original Research
                1506
                1737
                Custom metadata
                unlocked

                Medicine

                surgery, oncology, gastrointestinal tumours, adult surgery

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