7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for De Quervain disease of the wrist: what lies beyond the horizon?

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          De Quervain disease (DQVD) is one of the most common causes of lateral wrist pain and can lead to significant disability. The current case involves a right-handed, middle-aged, female patient with severe lateral wrist pain due to DQVD. Her pain was not responsive to oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, rehabilitation, and repeated corticosteroid injections. Because she refused surgical intervention, we performed ultrasound-guided methotrexate injections (four times). After the injections, dramatic pain relief, functional improvement, and reduction of the thickness of the retinaculum and tendons in the first dorsal extensor compartment of the wrist were noted. This case report highlights the potential usefulness of ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for recalcitrant DQVD of the wrist.

          Video abstract

          Related collections

          Most cited references 26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Molecular action of methotrexate in inflammatory diseases

          Despite the recent introduction of biological response modifiers and potent new small-molecule antirheumatic drugs, the efficacy of methotrexate is nearly unsurpassed in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. Although methotrexate was first introduced as an antiproliferative agent that inhibits the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines for the therapy of malignancies, it is now clear that many of the anti-inflammatory effects of methotrexate are mediated by adenosine. This nucleoside, acting at one or more of its receptors, is a potent endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator. In confirmation of this mechanism of action, recent studies in both animals and patients suggest that adenosine-receptor antagonists, among which is caffeine, reverse or prevent the anti-inflammatory effects of methotrexate.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

            Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

              Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2017
                26 September 2017
                : 10
                : 2299-2302
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Tanta University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
                [2 ]Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
                [3 ]Department of Radiology, Tanta University Hospitals, Tanta, Egypt
                [4 ]Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, Taiwan
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ke-Vin Chang, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 87 Neijiang Street, Wanhua, Taipei 10845, Taiwan, Email: pattap@ 123456pchome.com.tw
                Article
                jpr-10-2299
                10.2147/JPR.S143256
                5627726
                © 2017 Allam et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Case Report

                Anesthesiology & Pain management

                rehabilitation, hand, sonography, pain

                Comments

                Comment on this article