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      Isolation of microsatellite loci and reliable genotyping using noninvasive samples of a critically endangered primate, Trachypithecus leucocephalus.

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          Abstract

          Genetic information can be critical in identifying conservation priorities and developing conservation strategies. There is an urgent need for noninvasive genetic tools to study the wild populations of Asian colobine monkeys. The majority of these species are threatened with habitat destruction, population reduction and even extinction, but generally lack information on their genetic diversity and population structure. Genetic sampling and tissue collection have been scarce in these species owing to strict regulations on manipulation of endangered species, and the difficulties and risks associated with capturing these arboreal and fast-moving monkeys in the challenging environments that they inhabit. These difficulties have hindered the development of molecular genetic markers, which are usually derived from tissues or blood. In this study, we present a method for de novo microsatellite isolation and genotyping using DNA from noninvasive origins of a critically endangered Asian colobine, the white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus). Genomic DNA isolated from hair was shown to be sufficient for microsatellite enrichment and isolation, with similar isolation efficiencies as from tissue DNA. We identified and characterized 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, and evaluated their amplification success and genotyping reliability with 86 field-collected fecal samples. These results show that this panel of loci can produce reliable genotypes from fecal samples, and represent a useful tool for noninvasive investigation of genetic structure, individual identification and kinship assessment in this highly endangered species. Our approach can be applied to conservation genetic studies of other wild species that lack sequence information and tissue samples.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Integr Zool
          Integrative zoology
          Wiley
          1749-4877
          1749-4869
          Jul 2016
          : 11
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China.
          Article
          10.1111/1749-4877.12192
          26889667
          15d9d635-1374-4cb2-b9ab-72e703ef7a62
          © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.
          History

          Asian colobine,FIASCO,conservation genetics,hair,scatology
          Asian colobine, FIASCO, conservation genetics, hair, scatology

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