7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Elevated carbon dioxide has the potential to impact alarm cue responses in some freshwater fishes

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 56

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Ocean acidification impairs olfactory discrimination and homing ability of a marine fish.

          The persistence of most coastal marine species depends on larvae finding suitable adult habitat at the end of an offshore dispersive stage that can last weeks or months. We tested the effects that ocean acidification from elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) could have on the ability of larvae to detect olfactory cues from adult habitats. Larval clownfish reared in control seawater (pH 8.15) discriminated between a range of cues that could help them locate reef habitat and suitable settlement sites. This discriminatory ability was disrupted when larvae were reared in conditions simulating CO(2)-induced ocean acidification. Larvae became strongly attracted to olfactory stimuli they normally avoided when reared at levels of ocean pH that could occur ca. 2100 (pH 7.8) and they no longer responded to any olfactory cues when reared at pH levels (pH 7.6) that might be attained later next century on a business-as-usual carbon-dioxide emissions trajectory. If acidification continues unabated, the impairment of sensory ability will reduce population sustainability of many marine species, with potentially profound consequences for marine diversity.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Nonlinear mixed effects models for repeated measures data.

            We propose a general, nonlinear mixed effects model for repeated measures data and define estimators for its parameters. The proposed estimators are a natural combination of least squares estimators for nonlinear fixed effects models and maximum likelihood (or restricted maximum likelihood) estimators for linear mixed effects models. We implement Newton-Raphson estimation using previously developed computational methods for nonlinear fixed effects models and for linear mixed effects models. Two examples are presented and the connections between this work and recent work on generalized linear mixed effects models are discussed.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Ocean acidification disrupts the innate ability of fish to detect predator olfactory cues.

              While ocean acidification is predicted to threaten marine biodiversity, the processes that directly impact species persistence are not well understood. For marine species, early life history stages are inherently vulnerable to predators and an innate ability to detect predators can be critical for survival. However, whether or not acidification inhibits predator detection is unknown. Here, we show that newly hatched larvae of the marine fish Amphiprion percula innately detect predators using olfactory cues and this ability is retained through to settlement. Aquarium-reared larvae, not previously exposed to predators, were able to distinguish between the olfactory cues of predatory and non-predatory species. However, when eggs and larvae were exposed to seawater simulating ocean acidification (pH 7.8 and 1000 p.p.m. CO2) settlement-stage larvae became strongly attracted to the smell of predators and the ability to discriminate between predators and non-predators was lost. Newly hatched larvae were unaffected by CO2 exposure and were still able to distinguish between predatory and non-predatory fish. If this impairment of olfactory preferences in settlement-stage larvae translates to higher mortality as a result of increased predation risk, there could be direct consequences for the replenishment and the sustainability of marine populations.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Aquatic Ecology
                Aquat Ecol
                Springer Nature
                1386-2588
                1573-5125
                March 2017
                September 2016
                : 51
                : 1
                : 59-72
                Article
                10.1007/s10452-016-9598-8
                © 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article