9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Cincha transobturatriz con anestesia local para incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objetivo: Evaluar la técnica de cura de incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo con cincha transobturatriz bajo anestesia local. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo y prospectivo en 22 pacientes con incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo de la consulta de piso pélvico del Hospital Universitario de Caracas entre abril y noviembre de 2010, a las que se les colocó cincha transobturatriz con anestesia local y sedación consciente complementaria en la mayoría de los casos. Resultados: El tiempo quirúrgico promedio fue 9,57 min. Dos pacientes toleraron el procedimiento quirúrgico con anestesia local exclusiva, mientras que las otras 20 (90,9 %) requirieron sedación endovenosa, similar a lo descrito en la literatura. El dolor intraoperatorio en promedio fue de 3,18 puntos en la escala visual análoga. El 100 % de las pacientes estuvo satisfecha con el procedimiento anestésico y el 95,5 % lo recomienda. Conclusión: La anestesia local con sedación consciente constituye una técnica tolerable, segura, y rápida para la cura de incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo con cincha transobturatriz.

          Translated abstract

          Objective: To evaluate the transobturator tape procedure for urinary stress incontinence under local anesthesia. Methods: Prospective and descriptive study of 22 patients with urinary stress incontinence from the Pelvic Floor Unit of Universitary Hospital of Caracas, between April and November 2010, in whom the transobturator tape procedure was performed under local anesthesia and sedation. Results: Mean surgical time was 9.57 min. Two patients tolerated the surgical procedure with local anesthesia without sedation, while the other 20 (90.9 %) required intravenous sedation, as described in most publications. Mean intraoperative pain was 3.18 points in the Visual Analogue Scale. One hundred percent of the patients were satisfied with the anesthetic technique, and 95.5 % would recommend it. Conclusion: Local anesthesia with sedation is a well-tolerated, safe, and fast technique for the surgical treatment of urinary stress incontinence with transobturator tape.

          Related collections

          Most cited references34

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The prevalence of urinary incontinence in women in four European countries.

          To determine the prevalence, type and treatment behaviour of women with urinary incontinence in four European countries. Data were collected using a postal survey which was sent to 29,500 community-dwelling women aged > or = 18 years in France, Germany, Spain and the UK. Subjects were asked about the type of urinary incontinence they had experienced and their treatment behaviour. Of the women who responded, 35% reported involuntary loss of urine in the preceding 30 days; stress urinary incontinence was the most prevalent type. The lowest prevalence was in Spain (23%), while the prevalence was 44%, 41% and 42% for France, Germany and the UK, respectively. About a quarter of women with urinary incontinence in Spain (24%) and the UK (25%) had consulted a doctor about it; in France (33%) and Germany (40%) the percentages were higher. Overall, <5% of the women had ever undergone surgery for their condition. While pads were used by half of the women, there were some differences among the countries. Millions of women in Europe have urinary incontinence; the consultation and treatment rates were low in the European countries included in this study.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Urinary incontinence in US women: a population-based study.

            Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common disorder that is increasingly important as our population ages. Less is known about UI in younger women, and few large surveys have been able to determine risk factors by linking their data to patients' medical findings. We conducted a population-based, age-stratified postal survey of 6000 women aged between 30 and 90 years who were enrolled in a large health maintenance organization in Washington State. The response rate was 64% (n = 3536) after exclusion criteria were applied. The population-based prevalence of UI was 45%. Prevalence increased with age, from 28% for 30- to 39-year-old women to 55% for 80- to 90-year-old women. Eighteen percent of respondents reported severe UI. The prevalence of severe UI also increased notably with age, from 8% for 30- to 39-year-old women to 33% for 80- to 90-year-old women. Older age, higher body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters), greater medical comorbidity, current major depression, a history of hysterectomy, and parity increased the odds of having UI. Not being white and having had only cesarean deliveries decreased the odds of having UI. Major depression (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.65-3.72) and obesity, defined as having a BMI of 30 or greater (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.99-2.87), had the strongest association with UI. Among women with UI, age, BMI, medical comorbidity, current major depression, diabetes, a history of hysterectomy, and having had only cesarean deliveries were significantly associated with severe UI. Urinary incontinence is highly prevalent in women across their adult life span, and its severity increases linearly with age. Age, BMI, race, medical comorbidity, current major depression, a history of hysterectomy, parity, and having only had cesarean deliveries are each independent factors significantly associated with the likelihood of having UI.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Risk factors for urinary incontinence among middle-aged women.

              The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for urinary incontinence in middle-aged women. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 83,355 Nurses' Health Study II participants. Since 1989, women have provided health information on mailed questionnaires; in 2001, at the ages 37 to 54 years, information on urinary incontinence was requested. We examined adjusted odds ratios of incontinence using logistic regression. Forty-three percent of the women reported incontinence. After adjustment, black (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.40-0.60) and Asian-American women (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.46-0.72) were at reduced odds of severe incontinence compared with white women. Increased age, body mass index, parity, current smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hysterectomy all were associated positively with incontinence. Women who were aged 50 to 54 years had 1.81 times the odds of severe incontinence compared with women who were or =30 kg/m2 had 3.10 times the odds of severe incontinence compared with a body mass index of 22 to 24 kg/m2 (95% CI, 2.91-3.30). Urinary incontinence is highly prevalent among these middle-aged women. Potential risk factors include age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, parity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hysterectomy.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                og
                Revista de Obstetricia y Ginecología de Venezuela
                Rev Obstet Ginecol Venez
                Sociedad de Obstetricia y Ginecología de Venezuela (Caracas )
                0048-7732
                December 2011
                : 71
                : 4
                : 246-251
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Hospital Universitario de Caracas Venezuela
                [2 ] Hospital José Ignacio Baldó Venezuela
                [3 ] Hospital José Ignacio Baldó Venezuela
                [4 ] Universidad Central de Venezuela Venezuela
                [5 ] Universidad Central de Venezuela Venezuela
                [6 ] Universidad Central de Venezuela Venezuela
                Article
                S0048-77322011000400005
                16ca5a81-d4cf-44ee-a4c3-8b85ff9791c7

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History
                Product

                SciELO Venezuela

                Self URI (journal page): http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_serial&pid=0048-7732&lng=en
                Categories
                OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

                Obstetrics & Gynecology
                Urinary stress incontinence,Local anesthesia,Transobturator tape,Incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo,Anestesia local,Cincha transobturatriz

                Comments

                Comment on this article