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      Biodegradable compatibilized polymer blends for packaging applications: A literature review

      1 , 2 , 3 , 2 , 3
      Journal of Applied Polymer Science
      Wiley

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          Most cited references155

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          Processing technologies for poly(lactic acid)

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            High-levels of microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake.

            Despite the large and growing literature on microplastics in the ocean, little information exists on microplastics in freshwater systems. This study is the first to evaluate the abundance, distribution, and composition of pelagic microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake. We quantified pelagic microplastics and shoreline anthropogenic debris in Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia. With an average microplastic density of 20,264 particles km(-2), Lake Hovsgol is more heavily polluted with microplastics than the more developed Lakes Huron and Superior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Fragments and films were the most abundant microplastic types; no plastic microbeads and few pellets were observed. Household plastics dominated the shoreline debris and were comprised largely of plastic bottles, fishing gear, and bags. Microplastic density decreased with distance from the southwestern shore, the most populated and accessible section of the park, and was distributed by the prevailing winds. These results demonstrate that without proper waste management, low-density populations can heavily pollute freshwater systems with consumer plastics.
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              A microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) based bio- and materials industry.

              Biopolyesters polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) produced by many bacteria have been investigated by microbiologists, molecular biologists, biochemists, chemical engineers, chemists, polymer experts and medical researchers. PHA applications as bioplastics, fine chemicals, implant biomaterials, medicines and biofuels have been developed and are covered in this critical review. Companies have been established or involved in PHA related R&D as well as large scale production. Recently, bacterial PHA synthesis has been found to be useful for improving robustness of industrial microorganisms and regulating bacterial metabolism, leading to yield improvement on some fermentation products. In addition, amphiphilic proteins related to PHA synthesis including PhaP, PhaZ or PhaC have been found to be useful for achieving protein purification and even specific drug targeting. It has become clear that PHA and its related technologies are forming an industrial value chain ranging from fermentation, materials, energy to medical fields (142 references).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Polymer Science
                J. Appl. Polym. Sci.
                Wiley
                00218995
                June 20 2018
                June 20 2018
                October 05 2017
                : 135
                : 24
                : 45726
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institut de Recherche Dupuy de Lome (IRDL)-CNRS FRE 3744; University of South Brittany; Lorient 56100 France
                [2 ]School of Engineering; University of Guelph; Guelph Ontario Canada
                [3 ]Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Crop Science Building, Department of Plant Agriculture; University of Guelph; Guelph Ontario Canada
                Article
                10.1002/app.45726
                1895125e-11f2-4a77-89fd-2ba7ecaac32a
                © 2017

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor


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