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      Comparison of life‐history traits and oviposition preferences of Tuta absoluta for 12 common tomato varieties in Burkina Faso

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          Abstract

          The South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is an economically important insect pest of tomatoes. Since its discovery in Burkina Faso in 2016, the use of synthetic insecticides was favored, with many cases of treatment failure. To explore alternative control methods, we conducted a screening of the 12 main tomato varieties produced in the country to test two hypotheses: (i) Some tomato varieties are less likely to attract gravid females and be used as oviposition site; (ii) Some varieties are unsuitable host plants as they allow slower development and lead to higher mortality. The varieties tested include RomaVF, KanonF1, Cobra 26 F1, FBT1, FBT2, FBT3, RaissaF1, JampacktF1, Mongal, Rio Grande, Tropimech, and Petomech. T. absoluta fitness was largely impacted by the tomato variety, especially egg incubation time and larval and pupal stage durations. As a result, the total T. absoluta life cycle was slower on Cobra 26 F1 and Kanon F1 (24.6 ± 1.8 and 25.8 ± 3.3 days, respectively) and faster on FBT1 and Rio grande (22.6 ± 3.0 and 22.8 ± 2.6 days, respectively). None of the varieties impacted the adult lifespan. All varieties were accepted as hosts by gravid females during multiple‐choice oviposition assays. The number of eggs laid per female was statistically similar among the varieties. We conclude that two varieties, Kanon F1 and Cobra 26 F1, have better abilities to slow T. absoluta development, limiting the number of generations while increasing the probability that natural enemies find and kill their prey.

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          Role of phytohormones in insect-specific plant reactions.

          The capacity to perceive and respond is integral to biological immune systems, but to what extent can plants specifically recognize and respond to insects? Recent findings suggest that plants possess surveillance systems that are able to detect general patterns of cellular damage as well as highly specific herbivore-associated cues. The jasmonate (JA) pathway has emerged as the major signaling cassette that integrates information perceived at the plant-insect interface into broad-spectrum defense responses. Specificity can be achieved via JA-independent processes and spatio-temporal changes of JA-modulating hormones, including ethylene (ET), salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), auxin, cytokinins (CK), brassinosteroids (BR) and gibberellins (GB). The identification of receptors and ligands and an integrative view of hormone-mediated response systems are crucial to understand specificity in plant immunity to herbivores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            A meta-analysis of preference-performance relationships in phytophagous insects.

            The extent to which behavioural choices reflect fine-tuned evolutionary adaptation remains an open debate. For herbivorous insects, the preference-performance hypothesis (PPH) states that female insects will evolve to oviposit on hosts on which their offspring fare best. In this study, we use meta-analysis to assess the balance of evidence for and against the PPH, and to evaluate the role of individual factors proposed to influence host selection by female insects. We do so in an explicitly bitrophic context (herbivores versus plants). Overall, our analyses offer clear support for the PPH: Offspring survive better on preferred plant types, and females lay more eggs on plant types conducive to offspring performance. We also found evidence for an effect of diet breadth on host choice: female preference for 'good quality plants' was stronger in oligophagous insects than in polyphagous insects. Nonetheless, despite the large numbers of preference-performance studies conducted to date, sample sizes in our meta-analysis are low due to the inconsistent format used by authors to present their results. To improve the situation, we invite authors to contribute to the data base emerging from this work, with the aim of reaching a strengthened synthesis of the subject field.
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              Biological invasion of European tomato crops by Tuta absoluta: ecology, geographic expansion and prospects for biological control

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Physiological Entomology
                Physiol. Entomol.
                Wiley
                0307-6962
                1365-3032
                March 2022
                November 09 2021
                March 2022
                : 47
                : 1
                : 55-61
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Gembloux Agro‐Bio Tech, TERRA University of Liege Gembloux Belgium
                [2 ] Institut du Développement Rural Université Nazi Boni Bobo‐Dioulasso Burkina Faso
                [3 ] Productions Végétales Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles Bobo‐Dioulasso Burkina Faso
                [4 ] Productions Végétales Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles Ouagadougou Burkina Faso
                [5 ] Earth and Life Institute Université catholique de Louvain Louvain‐la‐Neuve Belgium
                Article
                10.1111/phen.12373
                1a0ac941-3f2e-43b2-b46b-701b8742aa50
                © 2022

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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