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      Mechanotransduction in bone cells proceeds via activation of COX-2, but not COX-1

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      Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Cyclooxygenase (COX) is the key enzyme in the production of prostaglandins, which are essential for the response of bone to mechanical loading. We determined which COX-isoform, COX-1 or COX-2, determines loading-induced prostaglandin production in primary bone cells in vitro. Mouse and human bone cells reacted to 1 h of pulsating fluid flow (PFF, 0.6+/-0.3 Pa at 5 Hz) with an increased prostaglandin E(2) production, which continued 24 h after cessation of PFF. Inhibition of COX-2 activity with NS-398 abolished the stimulating effect of PFF both at 1 h and at 24 h post-incubation, while inhibition of COX-1 by SC-560 affected neither the early nor the late response to flow. PFF rapidly stimulated COX-2 mRNA expression at 1 h but did not affect COX-1 mRNA expression. COX-2 mRNA expression was still significantly enhanced 24 h after cessation of PFF. We conclude that COX-2 is the mechanosensitive form of COX that determines the response of bone tissue to mechanical loading.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
          Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
          Elsevier BV
          0006291X
          June 2003
          June 2003
          : 305
          : 3
          : 677-683
          Article
          10.1016/S0006-291X(03)00831-3
          12763047
          1a174910-c047-4987-b431-d0e19afb5a5d
          © 2003

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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