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      The integrated cultural landscape of North Gidley Island: Coastal, intertidal and nearshore archaeology in Murujuga (Dampier Archipelago), Western Australia

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          Most cited references 52

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          Time perspectives, palimpsests and the archaeology of time

           Geoff Bailey (2007)
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            Living Archaeology: The Ngatatjara of Western Australia

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              Is Open Access

              Early human settlement of Sahul was not an accident

              The first peopling of Sahul (Australia, New Guinea and the Aru Islands joined at lower sea levels) by anatomically modern humans required multiple maritime crossings through Wallacea, with at least one approaching 100 km. Whether these crossings were accidental or intentional is unknown. Using coastal-viewshed analysis and ocean drift modelling combined with population projections, we show that the probability of randomly reaching Sahul by any route is <5% until ≥40 adults are ‘washed off’ an island at least once every 20 years. We then demonstrate that choosing a time of departure and making minimal headway (0.5 knots) toward a destination greatly increases the likelihood of arrival. While drift modelling demonstrates the existence of ‘bottleneck’ crossings on all routes, arrival via New Guinea is more likely than via northwestern Australia. We conclude that anatomically modern humans had the capacity to plan and make open-sea voyages lasting several days by at least 50,000 years ago.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Australian Archaeology
                Australian Archaeology
                Informa UK Limited
                0312-2417
                2470-0363
                August 30 2021
                : 1-17
                Affiliations
                [1 ]College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
                [2 ]School of Earth Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
                [3 ]Centre for Rock Art Research + Management, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
                [4 ]Centre for Research, Ethics, Custodianship, Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation, Karratha, Australia
                [5 ]ARA, Airborne Research Australia, Salisbury South, Australia
                [6 ]ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, College of Arts, Society and Education, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia
                [7 ]Department of Archaeology, University of York, The King's Manor, York, United Kingdom
                Article
                10.1080/03122417.2021.1949085
                © 2021

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