Blog
About

52
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Novel Multiplexed HIV/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Detection Assay

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This assay identified new simian immunodeficiency viruses in primate bushmeat.

          Abstract

          Like most emerging infectious disease viruses, HIV is also of zoonotic origin. To assess the risk for cross-species transmission of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) from nonhuman primates to humans in the Democratic Republic of Congo, we collected 330 samples derived from nonhuman primate bushmeat at 3 remote forest sites. SIV prevalences were estimated by using a novel high-throughput assay that included 34 HIV and SIV antigens in a single well. Overall, 19% of nonhuman primate bushmeat was infected with SIVs, and new SIV lineages were identified. Highest SIV prevalences were seen in red-tailed guenons (25%) and Tshuapa red colobus monkeys (24%), representing the most common hunted primate species, thus increasing the likelihood for cross-species transmission. Additional studies are needed to determine whether other SIVs crossed the species barrier. With the newly developed assay, large-scale screening against many antigens is now easier and faster.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          TOPALi v2: a rich graphical interface for evolutionary analyses of multiple alignments on HPC clusters and multi-core desktops

          Summary: TOPALi v2 simplifies and automates the use of several methods for the evolutionary analysis of multiple sequence alignments. Jobs are submitted from a Java graphical user interface as TOPALi web services to either run remotely on high-performance computing clusters or locally (with multiple cores supported). Methods available include model selection and phylogenetic tree estimation using the Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood (ML) approaches, in addition to recombination detection methods. The optimal substitution model can be selected for protein or nucleic acid (standard, or protein-coding using a codon position model) data using accurate statistical criteria derived from ML co-estimation of the tree and the substitution model. Phylogenetic software available includes PhyML, RAxML and MrBayes. Availability: Freely downloadable from http://www.topali.org for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux and Solaris. Contact: iain.milne@scri.ac.uk
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A new human immunodeficiency virus derived from gorillas.

            We have identified a new human immunodeficiency virus in a Cameroonian woman. It is closely related to gorilla simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVgor) and shows no evidence of recombination with other HIV-1 lineages. This new virus seems to be the prototype of a new HIV-1 lineage that is distinct from HIV-1 groups M, N and O. We propose to designate it HIV-1 group P.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              An African primate lentivirus (SIVsm) closely related to HIV-2.

              The ancestors of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) may have evolved from a reservoir of African nonhuman primate lentiviruses, termed simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV). None of the SIV strains characterized so far are closely related to HIV-1. HIV-2, however, is closely related to SIV (SIVmac) isolated from captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). SIV infection of feral Asian macaques has not been demonstrated by serological surveys. Thus, macaques may have acquired SIV in captivity by cross-species transmission from an SIV-infected African primate. Sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys), an African primate species indigenous to West Africa, however, are infected with SIV (SIVsm) both in captivity and in the wild (P. Fultz, personal communication). We have molecularly cloned and sequenced SIVsm and report here that it is closely related to SIVmac and HIV-2. These results suggest that SIVsm has infected macaques in captivity and humans in West Africa and evolved as SIVmac and HIV-2, respectively.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Emerg Infect Dis
                Emerging Infect. Dis
                EID
                Emerging Infectious Diseases
                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                1080-6040
                1080-6059
                December 2011
                : 17
                : 12
                : 2277-2286
                Affiliations
                University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France (S. Ahuka-Mundeke, A. Ayouba, F. Liegeois, A. Esteban, E. Delaporte, M. Peeters);
                Institut National de Recherche Biomédicales, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (S. Ahuka-Mundeke, P. Mbala-Kingebeni, O. Lunguya-Metila, J.-J. Muyembe-Tamfum);
                Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa, Kinshasa (S. Ahuka-Mundeke, P. Mbala-Kingebeni, O. Lunguya-Metila, J.-J. Muyembe-Tamfum);
                Zone de Santé de Kole, Sankuru, Kasai Oriental, Democratic Republic of Congo (D. Demba, G. Bilulu);
                World Wildlife Fund For Nature, Kinshasa (V. Mbenzo-Abokome, B-I. Inogwabini)
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Martine Peeters, Laboratoire Retrovirus, UMI233, IRD, 911 Ave, Agropolis, BP 64501, 34394 Montpellier CEDEX 1, France; email: martine.peeters@ 123456ird.fr
                Article
                11-0783
                10.3201/eid1712.110783
                3311211
                22172157
                Categories
                Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article