49
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The conflicts between strength and toughness.

      1
      Nature materials
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The attainment of both strength and toughness is a vital requirement for most structural materials; unfortunately these properties are generally mutually exclusive. Although the quest continues for stronger and harder materials, these have little to no use as bulk structural materials without appropriate fracture resistance. It is the lower-strength, and hence higher-toughness, materials that find use for most safety-critical applications where premature or, worse still, catastrophic fracture is unacceptable. For these reasons, the development of strong and tough (damage-tolerant) materials has traditionally been an exercise in compromise between hardness versus ductility. Drawing examples from metallic glasses, natural and biological materials, and structural and biomimetic ceramics, we examine some of the newer strategies in dealing with this conflict. Specifically, we focus on the interplay between the mechanisms that individually contribute to strength and toughness, noting that these phenomena can originate from very different lengthscales in a material's structural architecture. We show how these new and natural materials can defeat the conflict of strength versus toughness and achieve unprecedented levels of damage tolerance within their respective material classes.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nat Mater
          Nature materials
          Springer Science and Business Media LLC
          1476-1122
          1476-1122
          Oct 24 2011
          : 10
          : 11
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. RORitchie@lbl.gov
          Article
          nmat3115
          10.1038/nmat3115
          22020005
          20f64a33-760b-4eeb-8af3-c18404d30ffd
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article