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      Evaluating a Culturally Tailored HIV Risk Reduction Intervention Among Latina Immigrants in the Farmworker Community

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          Abstract

          Latina immigrants in the farmworker community are a vulnerable and understudied population at risk of acquiring HIV. Employing a CBPR framework, this pilot study was the first to evaluate the efficacy of SEPA, a CDC evidenced-based and culturally tailored HIV risk reduction intervention on a cohort of N = 110 predominantly undocumented Latina immigrants in a farmworker community. Findings revealed SEPA was effective in increasing HIV knowledge and decreasing HIV risk behaviors. However, no changes in self-efficacy were found in the present sample. We posit specific socio-cultural and structural barriers specific to the farmworker community not targeted in the original intervention may have hindered the program’s capacity to influence changes in self-efficacy among this less acculturated population. Possible socio-cultural adaptations of the intervention to the target population and policy implications are discussed.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          101538945
          41470
          World Med Health Policy
          World Med Health Policy
          World medical & health policy
          2153-2028
          1948-4682
          29 September 2017
          17 September 2016
          September 2016
          11 October 2017
          : 8
          : 3
          : 245-262
          Affiliations
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          University of Miami, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
          Florida International University, Center for Research on US Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)
          Author notes
          Corresponding author: Mariana Sanchez, msanche@ 123456fiu.edu
          Article
          PMC5636186 PMC5636186 5636186 nihpa909019
          10.1002/wmh3.193
          5636186
          29034116
          21300244-6408-4a60-a79d-cbb7ca5c6725
          History
          Categories
          Article

          HIV/AIDS,Hispanic,Latino/a,immigrant,farmworker,migrant worker,seasonal workers,women

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