3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The central amygdala as an integrative hub for anxiety and alcohol use disorders.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The central amygdala (CeA) plays a central role in physiologic and behavioral responses to fearful stimuli, stressful stimuli, and drug-related stimuli. The CeA receives dense inputs from cortical regions, is the major output region of the amygdala, is primarily GABAergic (inhibitory), and expresses high levels of prostress and antistress peptides. The CeA is also a constituent region of a conceptual macrostructure called the extended amygdala that is recruited during the transition to alcohol dependence. We discuss neurotransmission in the CeA as a potential integrative hub between anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorder, which are commonly co-occurring in humans. Imaging studies in humans and multidisciplinary work in animals collectively suggest that CeA structure and function are altered in individuals with anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorder, the end result of which may be disinhibition of downstream "effector" regions that regulate anxiety-related and alcohol-related behaviors.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biol. Psychiatry
          Biological psychiatry
          1873-2402
          0006-3223
          May 15 2015
          : 77
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana; Neuroscience Center of Excellence, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. Electronic address: ngilpi@lsuhsc.edu.
          [2 ] Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders (MAH, MR), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.
          Article
          S0006-3223(14)00707-0 NIHMS630220
          10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.09.008
          4398579
          25433901
          Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

          Comments

          Comment on this article