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      FTDP-17 with Pick body-like inclusions associated with a novel tau mutation, p.E372G : p.E372G and FTDP-17

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          Abstract

          Mutations in microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Here, we describe a patient with FTDP-17 and a novel missense mutation in exon 13 of MAPT, p.E372G. We compare clinicopathologic features of this patient to two previously unreported patients with another exon 13 mutation, p.G389R. The patient with the p.E372G mutation was a 40-year-old man with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), who subsequently developed agrammatic speech and parkinsonism. One of the FTDP-17 patients with p.G389R mutation presented at age 24 with agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and subsequently behavioral dysfunction. The other presented at age 53 with bvFTD, followed by agrammatic speech and corticobasal syndrome. Neuropathologic features of FTDP-17 due to p.E372G were similar to those of p.G389R, including tau-immunoreactive Pick body-like neuronal inclusions and swollen, tapering thread-like processes in white matter immunoreactive for 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau. Biochemical analysis of insoluble tau showed similar isoform compositions in p.E372G and p.G389R. Functional studies of the p.E372G mutation showed marked increase in tau filament formation and its reduced ability to promote microtubule assembly. Together these findings indicate that p.E372G is a pathogenic MAPT mutation that causes FTDP-17 similar to p.G389R.

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          Most cited references25

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          Tau is a candidate gene for chromosome 17 frontotemporal dementia.

          Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism, chromosome 17 type (FTDP-17), a recently defined disease entity, is clinically characterized by personality changes sometimes associated with psychosis, hyperorality, and diminished speech output, disturbed executive function and nonfluent aphasia, bradykinesia, and rigidity. Neuropathological changes include frontotemporal atrophy often associated with atrophy of the basal ganglia, substantia nigra, and amygdala. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are seen in some but not all families. Inheritance is autosomal dominant and the gene has been regionally localized to 17q21-22 in a 2- to 4-centimorgan (cM) region flanked by markers D17S800 and D17S791. The gene for tau, the primary component of NFTs, is located in the same region of chromosome 17. Tau was evaluated as a candidate gene. Physical mapping studies place tau within 2 megabases or less of D17S791, but it is probably outside the D17S800-D17S791 FTDP-17 interval. DNA sequence analysis of tau coding regions in affected subjects from two FTDP-17 families revealed nine DNA sequence variants, eight of which were also identified in controls and are thus polymorphisms. A ninth variant (Val279Met) was found in one FTDP-17 family but not in the second FTDP-17 family. Three lines of evidence indicate that the Val279Met change is an FTDP-17 causative mutation. First, the mutation site is highly conserved, and a normal valine is found at this position in all three tau interrepeat sequences and in other microtubule associated protein tau homologues. Second, the mutation co-segregates with the disease in family A. Third, the mutation is not found in normal controls.
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            Mutation-specific functional impairments in distinct tau isoforms of hereditary FTDP-17.

            Tau proteins aggregate as cytoplasmic inclusions in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and hereditary frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Over 10 exonic and intronic mutations in the tau gene have been identified in about 20 FTDP-17 families. Analyses of soluble and insoluble tau proteins from brains of FTDP-17 patients indicated that different pathogenic mutations differentially altered distinct biochemical properties and stoichiometry of brain tau isoforms. Functional assays of recombinant tau proteins with different FTDP-17 missense mutations implicated all but one of these mutations in disease pathogenesis by reducing the ability of tau to bind microtubules and promote microtubule assembly.
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              Tau proteins with FTDP-17 mutations have a reduced ability to promote microtubule assembly.

              Recently exonic and intronic mutations in the gene for microtubule-associated protein tau have been discovered in cases of familial frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Intronic mutations have been shown to lead to an abnormal preponderance of four-repeat tau isoforms. The effects of the exonic mutations are unknown. We report here that the G272V, P301L, V337M and R406W mutations lead to a marked reduction in the ability of tau to promote microtubule assembly. This partial loss-of-function may be the primary effect of the known missense mutations in tau.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Brain Pathology
                Brain Pathology
                Wiley
                10156305
                September 2017
                September 2017
                October 05 2016
                : 27
                : 5
                : 612-626
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic; Jacksonville FL
                [2 ]Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic; Jacksonville FL
                [3 ]Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic; Rochester MN
                [4 ]Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mayo Clinic; Rochester MN
                [5 ]Department of Neurology; Weill Cornell Medicine; New York NY
                [6 ]Department of Neurology; University of Florida College of Medicine; Gainesville FL
                Article
                10.1111/bpa.12428
                5380645
                27529406
                28cc37d1-0b71-4244-bb1d-cef258d8322a
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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