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      Frequency of nonaspirin NSAID-relevant coexisting medical conditions in the primary-care setting: a retrospective database review

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          Abstract

          Background

          Coexisting medical conditions and concomitant medications contribute to treatment challenges primary-care professionals (PCPs) face daily. The current study assessed the extent and distribution of nonaspirin NSAID-relevant coexisting medical conditions of interest (CMCOI) in patients visiting PCPs.

          Methods

          This retrospective database review analyzed data from three large health-care claim databases to identify the frequency of nonaspirin NSAID-relevant CMCOI among adults aged ≥18 years with a PCP visit in 2013. Claim databases employed were the Truven Health MarketScan ® Commercial Claims and Encounters database, representative of the privately insured (PI) population; Truven Health MarketScan Multi-State Medicaid, representative of the Medicaid population (Medicaid); and Truven MarketScan Medicare Supplemental, representative of the Medicare population with employer-based supplemental Medicare insurance (Medicare-Supplement). Nonaspirin NSAID-relevant CMCOI, asthma, cardiovascular risk factors, gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors, and renal insufficiency were chosen based on US NSAID over-the-counter Drug Facts label warnings. Frequency of CMCOI was determined for those without and with a musculoskeletal diagnosis.

          Results

          In each database, ≥19% (19.0% PI, 29.9% Medicaid, 33.6% Medicare-Supplement) had a musculoskeletal diagnosis. A greater proportion of individuals with a musculoskeletal diagnosis had one or more CMCOI compared with those without a musculoskeletal diagnosis (61.3% vs 50.4% PI, 78.1% vs 66.8% Medicaid, 87.1% vs 82.3% Medicare-Supplement). The frequency of one or more CMCOI increased with age in each database. Across databases among CMCOI, cardiovascular risk factors were most common, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors, and proportions were higher among those with a musculoskeletal diagnosis.

          Conclusion

          These data confirm the high frequency of nonaspirin NSAID-relevant CMCOI among patients presenting to PCPs for musculoskeletal diagnosis, as well as among older patients. These analyses reinforce the critical role health-care professionals can play in identifying patients with nonaspirin NSAID-relevant CMCOI, providing those patients with ongoing guidance on appropriate choice and use of over-the-counter analgesics, and educating patients about the impact aging, health status, concomitant conditions, and medicines have on selection of all medicines, including analgesics.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: network meta-analysis

          Objective To analyse the available evidence on cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Design Network meta-analysis. Data sources Bibliographic databases, conference proceedings, study registers, the Food and Drug Administration website, reference lists of relevant articles, and reports citing relevant articles through the Science Citation Index (last update July 2009). Manufacturers of celecoxib and lumiracoxib provided additional data. Study selection All large scale randomised controlled trials comparing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or placebo. Two investigators independently assessed eligibility. Data extraction The primary outcome was myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included stroke, death from cardiovascular disease, and death from any cause. Two investigators independently extracted data. Data synthesis 31 trials in 116 429 patients with more than 115 000 patient years of follow-up were included. Patients were allocated to naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, etoricoxib, rofecoxib, lumiracoxib, or placebo. Compared with placebo, rofecoxib was associated with the highest risk of myocardial infarction (rate ratio 2.12, 95% credibility interval 1.26 to 3.56), followed by lumiracoxib (2.00, 0.71 to 6.21). Ibuprofen was associated with the highest risk of stroke (3.36, 1.00 to 11.6), followed by diclofenac (2.86, 1.09 to 8.36). Etoricoxib (4.07, 1.23 to 15.7) and diclofenac (3.98, 1.48 to 12.7) were associated with the highest risk of cardiovascular death. Conclusions Although uncertainty remains, little evidence exists to suggest that any of the investigated drugs are safe in cardiovascular terms. Naproxen seemed least harmful. Cardiovascular risk needs to be taken into account when prescribing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.
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            EULAR evidence based recommendations for the management of hip osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT).

            To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of hip osteoarthritis (OA). The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 18 rheumatologists, 4 orthopaedic surgeons, and 1 epidemiologist, representing 14 European countries. Each participant contributed up to 10 propositions describing key clinical aspects of hip OA management. Ten final recommendations were agreed using a Delphi consensus approach. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and HTA reports were searched systematically to obtain research evidence for each proposition. Where possible, outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. Effect size, rate ratio, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the evidence hierarchy. The strength of recommendation was assessed using the traditional A-D grading scale and a visual analogue scale. Ten key treatment propositions were generated through three Delphi rounds. They included 21 interventions, such as paracetamol, NSAIDs, symptomatic slow acting disease modifying drugs, opioids, intra-articular steroids, non-pharmacological treatment, total hip replacement, osteotomy, and two general propositions. 461 studies were identified from the literature search for the proposed interventions of efficacy, side effects, and cost effectiveness. Research evidence supported 15 interventions in the treatment of hip OA. Evidence specific for the hip was strikingly lacking. Strength of recommendation varied according to category of research evidence and expert opinion. Ten key recommendations for the treatment of hip OA were developed based on research evidence and expert consensus. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of these recommendations were evaluated and the strength of recommendation was scored.
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              Guiding principles for the care of older adults with multimorbidity: an approach for clinicians: American Geriatrics Society Expert Panel on the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

                (2012)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2019
                24 April 2019
                : 15
                : 579-588
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc, McNeil Consumer Healthcare Division, Fort Washington, PA, USA, lbloom@ 123456its.jnj.com
                [2 ]KE Boyle Consultants, Exton, PA, USA
                [3 ]Janssen Research and Development, Titusville, NJ, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Leslie Bloom, Johnson & Johnson Consumer, McNeil Consumer Healthcare Division, 7050 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, PA 19034, USA, Tel +1 215 273 8729, Fax +1 215 273 4232, Email lbloom@ 123456its.jnj.com
                Article
                tcrm-15-579
                10.2147/TCRM.S189833
                6488163
                © 2019 Bloom et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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