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      One-Sided Violence Against Civilians in War : Insights from New Fatality Data

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      Journal of Peace Research

      SAGE Publications

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          Monitoring Trends in Global Combat: A New Dataset of Battle Deaths

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            No Lessons Learned from the Holocaust? Assessing Risks of Genocide and Political Mass Murder since 1955

             Barbara Harff (2003)
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              Handling and Manhandling Civilians in Civil War

              The toll of civil conflict is largely borne by civilian populations, as warring factions target non-combatants through campaigns of violence. But significant variation exists in the extent to which warring groups abuse the civilian population: across conflicts, across groups, and within countries geographically and over time. Using a new dataset on fighting groups in Sierra Leone, this article analyzes the determinants of the tactics, strategies, and behaviors that warring factions employ in their relationships with noncombatants. We first describe a simple logic of extraction which we use to generate hypotheses about variation in levels of abuse across fighting units. We then show that the most important determinants of civilian abuse are internal to the structure of the faction. High levels of abuse are exhibited by warring factions that are unable to police the behavior of their members because they are more ethnically fragmented, rely on material incentives to recruit participants, and lack mechanisms for punishing indiscipline. Explanations that emphasize the importance of local community ties and contestation do not find strong support in the data.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Peace Research
                Journal of Peace Research
                SAGE Publications
                0022-3433
                1460-3578
                July 2016
                July 2016
                : 44
                : 2
                : 233-246
                Article
                10.1177/0022343307075124
                © 2016

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