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      Patterning of superhydrophobic paper to control the mobility of micro-liter drops for two-dimensional lab-on-paper applications.

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          Abstract

          Superhydrophobic paper substrates were patterned with high surface energy black ink using commercially available desktop printing technology. The shape and size of the ink islands were designed to control the adhesion forces on water drops in two directions, parallel ('drag-adhesion') and perpendicular ('extensional-adhesion') to the substrate. Experimental data on the adhesion forces shows good agreement with classical models for 'drag' (Furmidge equation) and 'extensional' adhesion (modified Dupré equation). The tunability of the two adhesion forces was used to implement four basic unit operations for the manipulation of liquid drops on the paper substrates: storage, transfer, mixing and sampling. By combining these basic functionalities it is possible to design simple two-dimensional lab-on-paper (LOP) devices. In our 2D LOP prototype, liquid droplets adhere to the porous substrate, rather than absorbing into the paper; as a result, liquid droplets remain accessible for further quantitative testing and analysis, after performing simple qualitative on-chip testing. In addition, the use of commercially available desktop printers and word processing software to generate ink patterns enable end users to design LOP devices for specific applications.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Lab Chip
          Lab on a chip
          Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
          1473-0197
          1473-0189
          Nov 07 2009
          : 9
          : 21
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100, USA.
          Article
          10.1039/b909868b
          19823721
          2fad9727-7854-4c27-807b-6d00d8058606
          History

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