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      The bushmeat trade in African savannas: Impacts, drivers, and possible solutions

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          Most cited references79

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          Effectiveness of parks in protecting tropical biodiversity.

          We assessed the impacts of anthropogenic threats on 93 protected areas in 22 tropical countries to test the hypothesis that parks are an effective means to protect tropical biodiversity. We found that the majority of parks are successful at stopping land clearing, and to a lesser degree effective at mitigating logging, hunting, fire, and grazing. Park effectiveness correlates with basic management activities such as enforcement, boundary demarcation, and direct compensation to local communities, suggesting that even modest increases in funding would directly increase the ability of parks to protect tropical biodiversity.
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            THE ROLE OF PROTECTED AREAS IN CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINING LOCAL LIVELIHOODS

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              Bushmeat hunting, wildlife declines, and fish supply in West Africa.

              The multibillion-dollar trade in bushmeat is among the most immediate threats to the persistence of tropical vertebrates, but our understanding of its underlying drivers and effects on human welfare is limited by a lack of empirical data. We used 30 years of data from Ghana to link mammal declines to the bushmeat trade and to spatial and temporal changes in the availability of fish. We show that years of poor fish supply coincided with increased hunting in nature reserves and sharp declines in biomass of 41 wildlife species. Local market data provide evidence of a direct link between fish supply and subsequent bushmeat demand in villages and show bushmeat's role as a dietary staple in the region. Our results emphasize the urgent need to develop cheap protein alternatives to bushmeat and to improve fisheries management by foreign and domestic fleets to avert extinctions of tropical wildlife.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biological Conservation
                Biological Conservation
                Elsevier BV
                00063207
                April 2013
                April 2013
                : 160
                :
                : 80-96
                Article
                10.1016/j.biocon.2012.12.020
                36c13342-80da-4e5d-83b1-77f12a49ffd2
                © 2013
                History

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