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      Early child care and adolescent functioning at the end of high school: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development.

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          Abstract

          Relations between early child care and adolescent functioning at the end of high school (EOHS; M age = 18.3 years) were examined in a prospective longitudinal study of 1,214 children. Controlling for extensive measures of family background, early child care was associated with academic standing and behavioral adjustment at the EOHS. More experience in center-type care was linked to higher class rank and admission to more selective colleges, and for females to less risk taking and greater impulse control. Higher quality child care predicted higher academic grades and admission to more selective colleges. Fewer hours in child care was related to admission to more selective colleges. These findings suggest long-term benefits of higher quality child care, center-type care, and lower child-care hours for measures of academic standing at the EOHS. (PsycINFO Database Record

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Dev Psychol
          Developmental psychology
          American Psychological Association (APA)
          1939-0599
          0012-1649
          Oct 2016
          : 52
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Education, University of California, Irvine.
          [2 ] Frank Porter Graham Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
          Article
          2016-46467-006 NIHMS807765
          10.1037/dev0000169
          5115787
          27690496

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