5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Availability of Healthier Children’s Menu Items in the Top Selling Quick Service Restaurant Chains (2004–2015)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objectives. To describe time trends in the availability of healthier children’s menu items in the top selling quick service restaurant (QSR) chains. Methods. We used Technomic Inc.’s MenuMonitor to construct a data set of side and beverage items available on children’s menus from 2004 to 2015 at 20 QSR chains in the United States. We evaluated the significance of time trends in the average availability of healthier fruit and nonfried vegetable sides and nonsugary beverages offered as options and by default in children’s meal bundles. Results. Healthier sides and beverages offered as options increased by 57.5 and 25.0 percentage points, respectively, from 2004 to 2015 but leveled off starting in 2013. Healthier items bundled by default also increased during this time frame, with most adoption occurring after 2010. However, these items remain relatively uncommon, with less than 20% of meal bundles including healthier items by default. All tests evaluating time trends in the availability of healthier items in meal bundles were significant at P  < .001. Conclusions. The QSRs evaluated made improvements in the quality of sides and beverages offered on children’s menus from 2004 to 2015. Additional efforts are needed to increase the percentage of healthier options offered by default.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 5

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Fast-food and full-service restaurant consumption among children and adolescents: effect on energy, beverage, and nutrient intake.

          To examine the effect of fast-food and full-service restaurant consumption on total energy intake, dietary indicators, and beverage consumption. Individual-level fixed-effects estimation based on 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls. Nationally representative data from the 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Children aged 2 to 11 years (n = 4717) and adolescents aged 12 to 19 years (n = 4699). Daily total energy intake in kilocalories; intake of grams of sugar, total fat, saturated fat, and protein and milligrams of sodium; and total grams of sugar-sweetened beverages, regular soda, and milk consumed. Fast-food and full-service restaurant consumption, respectively, was associated with a net increase in daily total energy intake of 126.29 kcal and 160.49 kcal for children and 309.53 kcal and 267.30 kcal for adolescents and with higher intake of regular soda (73.77 g and 88.28 g for children and 163.67 g and 107.25 g for adolescents) and sugar-sweetened beverages generally. Fast-food consumption increased intake of total fat (7.03-14.36 g), saturated fat (1.99-4.64 g), and sugar (5.71-16.24 g) for both age groups and sodium (396.28 mg) and protein (7.94 g) for adolescents. Full-service restaurant consumption was associated with increases in all nutrients examined. Additional key findings were (1) adverse effects on diet were larger for lower-income children and adolescents and (2) among adolescents, increased soda intake was twice as large when fast food was consumed away from home than at home. Fast-food and full-service restaurant consumption is associated with higher net total energy intake and poorer diet quality.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Default options in advance directives influence how patients set goals for end-of-life care.

            Although decisions regarding end-of-life care are personal and important, they may be influenced by the ways in which options are presented. To test this hypothesis, we randomly assigned 132 seriously ill patients to complete one of three types of advance directives. Two types had end-of-life care options already checked-a default choice-but one of these favored comfort-oriented care, and the other, life-extending care. The third type was a standard advance directive with no options checked. We found that most patients preferred comfort-oriented care, but the defaults influenced those choices. For example, 77 percent of patients in the comfort-oriented group retained that choice, while 43 percent of those in the life-extending group rejected the default choice and selected comfort-oriented care instead. Among the standard advance directive group, 61 percent of patients selected comfort-oriented care. Our findings suggest that patients may not hold deep-seated preferences regarding end-of-life care. The findings provide motivation for future research examining whether using default options in advance directives may improve important outcomes, including patients' receipt of wanted and unwanted services, resource use, survival, and quality of life.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Changes in children's meal orders following healthy menu modifications at a regional U.S. restaurant chain.

              To examine changes in children's meal orders, price, and revenue following the implementation of a healthier children's menu in a full-service restaurant chain.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Journal of Public Health
                Am J Public Health
                American Public Health Association
                0090-0036
                1541-0048
                February 2019
                February 2019
                : 109
                : 2
                : 267-269
                Affiliations
                [1 ]At the time of this study, Megan P. Mueller was with the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Boston, MA. Parke Wilde, Sara C. Folta, and Christina D. Economos are with the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Stephanie Anzman-Frasca is with the Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.
                Article
                10.2105/AJPH.2018.304800
                6336049
                30571297
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article