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      Stigmatization of People with Mental Illness in Students of Clinical Social Worker Branch (Original Research)

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          Objective: The objective is to determine the degree of stigmatization of people with mental illness in the Clinical Social Worker students. Design: Pilot study. Participants: 32 students of College of Polytechnics Jihlava.12 students were taught with and 20 without peer lecturers. Methods: Stigmatization was measured by the RIBS questionnaire. An additional question focused on work with clients with a psychiatric illness. The data were processed in MS Excel and IBM SPSS Statistics 22. For comparing the probability distribution of categorical variables the chi square goodness of fit test and semantic differential were used. Results: It is not possible to clearly describe statistically significant differences between the groups. However, it is evident that lessons with peer lecturers reduce stigmatization. Conclusion: Instruction with peer lecturers has been justified. Destigmatization-oriented teaching and further research into the stigmatization of the mentally ill will continue.

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          Development and psychometric properties of the reported and intended behaviour scale (RIBS): a stigma-related behaviour measure.

          Although stigma in relation to mental health has been defined as including components of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour, no psychometrically tested instrument to assess behavioural discrimination at the population level has been developed. This paper presents details of the development and psychometric properties of the Reported and Intended Behaviour Scale (RIBS), an instrument based on the Star Social Distance Scale, to assess reported (past and current) and intended (future) behavioural discrimination among the general public against people with mental health problems. Three studies were carried out to evaluate psychometric properties of the RIBS (Study 1, n = 92; Study 2, n = 37; Study 3, n = 403). Adults aged 25-45 in socio-economic groups: B, C1 and C2 (middle-income groups) took part in development and testing of the RIBS. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability is moderate/substantial. Strong consensus validity was found, as rated by service users/consumers and international experts in stigma research. Use of a behavioural outcome may be important to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions intended to reduce stigma and/or discrimination related to mental illness. The RIBS was found to be a brief, feasible and psychometrically robust measure for assessing mental health-related reported and intended behavioural discrimination.
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            Reported and intended behaviour towards those with mental health problems in the Czech Republic and England.

            This is one of the first studies, which compares the level of stigmatizing behaviour in countries that used to be on the opposite sides of the Iron Curtain. The aim was to identify the prevalence of reported and intended stigmatizing behaviour towards those with mental health problems in the Czech Republic and to compare these findings with the findings from England. The 8-item Reported and Intended Behaviour Scale (RIBS) was used to assess stigmatising behaviour among a representative sample of the Czech population (n=1797). Results were compared with the findings of an analogous survey from England (n=1720), which also used the RIBS. The extent of reported behaviour (i.e., past and present experiences with those with mental health problems) was lower in the Czech Republic than in England. While 12.7% of Czechs reported that they lived, 12.9% that they worked, and 15.3% that they were acquainted with someone who had mental health problems, the respective numbers for England were 18.5%, 26.3% and 32.5% (P<0.001 in each of these items). On the other hand, the extent of intended stigmatizing behaviour towards those with mental health problems is considerably higher in the Czech Republic. Out of maximum 20 points attached to possible responses to the RIBS items 5-8, Czechs had a lower total score (x=11.0, SD=4.0) compared to English respondents (x=16.1, SD=3.6), indicating lower willingness to accept a person with mental health problems (P<0.001). The prevalence of stigmatizing behaviour in the Czech Republic is worrying. Both, further research and evidence based anti-stigma interventions, should be pursued in order to better understand and decrease stigmatizing behaviour in the Czech Republic and possibly across the post-communist countries in Central and Eastern Europe.
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              Author and article information

              Journal
              Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
              CSWHI
              Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
              2222386X
              20769741
              December 28 2017
              December 28 2017
              : 8
              : 4
              : 25-34
              Article
              10.22359/cswhi_8_4_03
              © 2017

              This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

              Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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