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      Integrating Indigenous Abaluhya Worldview with Western Scientific Approaches in Communicating Climate Change Related to Conservation of Kakamega Forest

      African Journal of Empirical Research
      AJER Publishing

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          Abstract

          Communicating climate change remains an integral aspect of the quest to manage the impacts of climate change. Communicating climate change largely takes the western scientific approach without much consideration of African traditional knowledge. Communicating climate change has not elicited the desired response from the community that lives adjacent to Kakamega Forest. Abaluhyia people have had ways of conserving their forests, which ensured their posterity. The study aimed to assess the potential for integrating the indigenous Abaluhya worldview with western scientific approaches to communicate climate change in relation to the conservation of Kakamega Forest. The study was qualitative and used a descriptive design. The study drew data from interviews, Focus Group Discussions and review of secondary sources. The study revealed that the attitude and response of the members of the community that lives adjacent to Kakamega Forest show that they are not heeding the communication on climate change related to the conservation of Kakamega Forest, as demonstrated by their continued destruction of the forest. The results of the study identified some challenges that hamper a positive response to communicating climate change. The study revealed that the indigenous Abaluhyia worldview’s communication media, which are consistent with their values, beliefs, and practices, have the potential to enhance communication about climate change related to the conservation of Kakamega Forest. Therefore, this study recommends the integration of indigenous Abaluhyia worldviews with western scientific approaches in communicating climate change data related to the conservation of Kakamega Forest.

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          Most cited references7

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          Communicating climate change: history, challenges, process and future directions

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            Communicating climate change: challenges ahead and action needed

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              Enhancing climate governance through indigenous knowledge: Case in sustainability science

              The current tempo of climate change strategies puts the notion of sustainability in question. In this philosophy, mitigation and adaptation strategies ought to be appropriate to the sectors and communities that are targeted. There is a growing realisation that the effectiveness of both strategies hinges on climate governance, which also informs their sustainability. The application of the climate governance concept by the technocratic divide (policymakers and climate practitioners) to communities facing climate change impacts, however, is still a poorly developed field, despite extensive treatment by academia. By drawing heavily from conceptual and analytical review of scholarship on the utility of indigenous knowledge (IK) in climate science, these authors argue that IK can be deployed in the practice of climate governance. It reveals that the merits of such a deployment lie in the understanding that the tenets of IK and climate governance overlap and are complementary. This is exhibited by examining the conceptual, empirical and sustainability strands of the climate governance-IK nexus. In the milieu of climate change problems, it is argued that the basic elements of climate governance, where actions are informed by the principles of decentralisation and autonomy; accountability and transparency; responsiveness and flexibility; and participation and inclusion, can be pragmatic particularly to communities who have been religiously observing changes in their environment. Therefore, it becomes necessary to invigorate the participation of communities, with their IK, in designing climate change interventions, which in this view can be a means to attain the objectives of climate governance.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                African Journal of Empirical Research
                AJERNET
                AJER Publishing
                2709-2607
                July 05 2023
                November 22 2023
                : 4
                : 2
                : 1217-1227
                Article
                10.51867/ajernet.4.2.123
                3d5bbabc-1b9d-4afd-8439-d8a69b09cd20
                © 2023

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

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