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      Phase Segregation Enhanced Ion Movement in Efficient Inorganic CsPbIBr2 Solar Cells

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          Organometal halide perovskites as visible-light sensitizers for photovoltaic cells.

          Two organolead halide perovskite nanocrystals, CH(3)NH(3)PbBr(3) and CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3), were found to efficiently sensitize TiO(2) for visible-light conversion in photoelectrochemical cells. When self-assembled on mesoporous TiO(2) films, the nanocrystalline perovskites exhibit strong band-gap absorptions as semiconductors. The CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3)-based photocell with spectral sensitivity of up to 800 nm yielded a solar energy conversion efficiency of 3.8%. The CH(3)NH(3)PbBr(3)-based cell showed a high photovoltage of 0.96 V with an external quantum conversion efficiency of 65%.
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            Compositional engineering of perovskite materials for high-performance solar cells.

            Of the many materials and methodologies aimed at producing low-cost, efficient photovoltaic cells, inorganic-organic lead halide perovskite materials appear particularly promising for next-generation solar devices owing to their high power conversion efficiency. The highest efficiencies reported for perovskite solar cells so far have been obtained mainly with methylammonium lead halide materials. Here we combine the promising-owing to its comparatively narrow bandgap-but relatively unstable formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3) with methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) as the light-harvesting unit in a bilayer solar-cell architecture. We investigated phase stability, morphology of the perovskite layer, hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics, and overall performance as a function of chemical composition. Our results show that incorporation of MAPbBr3 into FAPbI3 stabilizes the perovskite phase of FAPbI3 and improves the power conversion efficiency of the solar cell to more than 18 per cent under a standard illumination of 100 milliwatts per square centimetre. These findings further emphasize the versatility and performance potential of inorganic-organic lead halide perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications.
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              Efficient and stable solution-processed planar perovskite solar cells via contact passivation

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advanced Energy Materials
                Adv. Energy Mater.
                Wiley
                16146832
                October 2017
                October 2017
                July 12 2017
                : 7
                : 20
                : 1700946
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Monash University; Victoria 3800 Australia
                [2 ]ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science; Monash University; Victoria 3800 Australia
                [3 ]Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy; Monash University; Victoria 3800 Australia
                [4 ]School of Physics and Astronomy; Monash University; Victoria 3800 Australia
                [5 ]School of Chemistry; Monash University; Victoria 3800 Australia
                [6 ]State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing; Wuhan University of Technology; Wuhan 430070 China
                [7 ]Melbourne Centre for Nano fabrication; 151 Wellington Road Clayton Victoria 3168 Australia
                [8 ]Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization; Manufacturing Flagship; Clayton Victoria 3168 Australia
                10.1002/aenm.201700946
                © 2017

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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