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      Investigating Factors Associated With not Reporting Medical Errors From the Medical Team’S Point of View in Jahrom, Iran

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          Abstract

          Background:

          medical errors as a problematic fact in healthcare systems can increase patient’s safety if reported. This article tried to determine several factors associated with not reporting medical errors from medical team’s points of view.

          Methods:

          300 staff working in different parts of educational hospitals affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences including nursing, midwifery, paramedical and medical groups participated in this descriptive study using census method (2013). Data collection was performed using a researcher-made questionnaire including 31 items regarding four areas: medical teams, managers, errors and patients.

          Results:

          The mean score of factors related to errors, mangers, medical teams, and patients’ scope was 2.68 ± 0.79, 2.63 ± 0.72, 2.53 ± 0.66, 2.41 ± 0.87, respectively. In medical teams’ points of view, errors and managers were among the important factors for not reporting professional errors. The most important factors in professional errors were related to severity and emergency of errors (2.73 ± 0.97), and managers’ focus on wrongdoers instead of noticing systematic factors of errors (3.00 ± 1.01). In medical teams, fear of legal prosecution by patients or their relatives (2.87 ± .97), and in patients, unawareness of errors (2.67 ± 1.08) was reported as the most effective factors.

          Conclusion:

          Factors related to errors and managers were more important than other reasons. Therefore, educating medical teams on recognizing errors and managers’ proper reactions in case of occurring or reporting errors seem to be necessary.

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          Most cited references 41

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          Characteristics of medication errors made by students during the administration phase: a descriptive study.

          Faculty concentrate on teaching nursing students about safe medication administration practices and on challenging them to develop skills for calculating drug dose and intravenous flow rate problems. In spite of these efforts, students make medication errors and little is known about the attributes of these errors. Therefore, this descriptive, retrospective, secondary analysis study examined the characteristics of medication errors made by nursing students during the administration phase of the medication use process as reported to the MEDMARX, a database operated by the United States Pharmacopeia through the Patient Safety Program. Fewer than 3% of 1,305 student-made medication errors occurring in the administration process resulted in patient harm. Most were omission errors, followed by errors of giving the wrong dose (amount) of a drug. The most prevalent cause of the errors was students' performance deficits, whereas inexperience and distractions were leading contributing factors. The antimicrobial therapeutic class of drugs and the 10 subcategories within this class were the most commonly reported medications involved. Insulin was the highest-frequency single medication reported. Overall, this study shows that students' administration errors may be more frequent than suspected. Faculty might consider curriculum revisions that incorporate medication use safety throughout each course in nursing major courses.
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            Factors associated with reporting nursing errors in Iran: a qualitative study

            Background Reporting the professional errors for improving patient safety is considered essential not only in hospitals, but also in ambulatory care centers. Unfortunately, a great number of nurses, similar to most clinicians, do not report their errors. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the factors associated with reporting the nursing errors through the experiences of clinical nurses and nursing managers. Methods A total of 115 nurses working in the hospitals and specialized clinics affiliated to Tehran and Shiraz Universities of Medical Sciences, Iran participated in this qualitative study. The study data were collected through a semi-structured group discussion conducted in 17 sessions and analyzed by inductive content analysis approach. Results The main categories emerged in this study were: a) general approaches of the nurses towards errors, b) barriers in reporting the nursing errors, and c) motivators in error reporting. Conclusion Error reporting provides extremely valuable information for preventing future errors and improving the patient safety. Overall, regarding motivators and barriers in reporting the nursing errors, it is necessary to enact regulations in which the ways of reporting the error and its constituent elements, such as the notion of the error, are clearly identified.
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              Medical error, disclosure and patient safety: a global view of quality care.

              Medical errors are a prominent issue in health care. Numerous studies point at the high prevalence of adverse events, many of which are preventable. Although there is a range of severity in errors, they all cause harm, to the patient, to the system, or both. While errors have many causes, including human interactions and system inadequacies, the focus on individuals rather than the system has led to an unsuitable culture for improving patient safety. Important areas of focus are diagnostic procedures and clinical laboratories because their results play a major role in guiding clinical decisions in patient management. Proper disclosure of medical errors and adverse events is also a key area for improvement. Globally, system improvements are beginning to take place, however, in Canada, policies on disclosure, error reporting and protection for physicians remain non-uniform. Achieving a national standard with mandatory reporting, in addition to a non-punitive system is recommended to move forward. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Glob J Health Sci
                Glob J Health Sci
                Global Journal of Health Science
                Canadian Center of Science and Education (Canada )
                1916-9736
                1916-9744
                November 2014
                15 July 2014
                : 6
                : 6
                : 96-104
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Saeedeh Rahmanian, Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Medical Sciences, Motahari Street, Jahrom, Iran. Tel: 98-791-334-1501. E-mail: Sa.Rahmanian@ 123456yahoo.com
                Article
                GJHS-6-96
                10.5539/gjhs.v6n6p96
                4825519
                25363120
                Copyright: © Canadian Center of Science and Education

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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