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      The Fate of a Hapten - From the Skin to Modification of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Lymph Nodes

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          Abstract

          Skin (contact) allergy, the most prevalent form of immunotoxicity in humans, is caused by low molecular weight chemicals (haptens) that penetrate stratum corneum and modify endogenous proteins. The fate of haptens after cutaneous absorption, especially what protein(s) they react with, is largely unknown. In this study the fluorescent hapten tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC) was used to identify hapten-protein conjugates in the local lymph nodes after topical application, as they play a key role in activation of the adaptive immune system. TRITC interacted with dendritic cells but also with T and B cells in the lymph nodes as shown by flow cytometry. Identification of the most abundant TRITC-modified protein in lymph nodes by tandem mass spectrometry revealed TRITC-modification of the N-terminal proline of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) – an evolutionary well-conserved protein involved in cell-mediated immunity and inflammation. This is the first time a hapten-modified protein has been identified in lymph nodes after topical administration of the hapten. Most haptens are electrophiles and can therefore modify the N-terminal proline of MIF, which has an unusually reactive amino group under physiological conditions; thus, modification of MIF by haptens may have an immunomodulating role in contact allergy as well as in other immunotoxicity reactions.

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          Most cited references 70

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          Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a regulator of innate immunity.

          For more than a quarter of a century, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been a mysterious cytokine. In recent years, MIF has assumed an important role as a pivotal regulator of innate immunity. MIF is an integral component of the host antimicrobial alarm system and stress response that promotes the pro-inflammatory functions of immune cells. A rapidly increasing amount of literature indicates that MIF is implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, suggesting that MIF-directed therapies might offer new treatment opportunities for human diseases in the future.
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            Dynamics and function of Langerhans cells in vivo: dermal dendritic cells colonize lymph node areas distinct from slower migrating Langerhans cells.

            Langerhans cells (LCs) are prominent dendritic cells (DCs) in epithelia, but their role in immunity is poorly defined. To track and discriminate LCs from dermal DCs in vivo, we developed knockin mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the langerin (CD207) gene. By using vital imaging, we showed that most EGFP(+) LCs were sessile under steady-state conditions, whereas skin inflammation induced LC motility and emigration to lymph nodes (LNs). After skin immunization, dermal DCs arrived in LNs first and colonized areas distinct from slower migrating LCs. LCs reaching LNs under steady-state or inflammatory conditions expressed similar levels of costimulatory molecules. Langerin and EGFP were also expressed on thymic DCs and on blood-derived, CD8alpha(+) DCs from all secondary lymphoid organs. By using a similar knockin strategy involving a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) fused to EGFP, we demonstrated that LCs were dispensable for triggering hapten-specific T cell effectors through skin immunization.
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              The conduit system transports soluble antigens from the afferent lymph to resident dendritic cells in the T cell area of the lymph node.

              Resident dendritic cells (DC) within the T cell area of the lymph node take up soluble antigens that enter via the afferent lymphatics before antigen carrying DC arrive from the periphery. The reticular network within the lymph node is a conduit system forming the infrastructure for the fast delivery of soluble substances from the afferent lymph to the lumen of high endothelial venules (HEVs). Using high-resolution light microscopy and 3D reconstruction, we show here that these conduits are unique basement membrane-like structures ensheathed by fibroblastic reticular cells with occasional resident DC embedded within this cell layer. Conduit-associated DC are capable of taking up and processing soluble antigens transported within the conduits, whereas immigrated mature DC occur remote from the reticular fibers. The conduit system is, therefore, not a closed compartment that shuttles substances through the lymph node but represents the morphological equivalent to the filtering function of the lymph node.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 9377, GRID grid.10548.38, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, , Stockholm University, ; Stockholm, Sweden
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0000 9919 9582, GRID grid.8761.8, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Dermatochemistry, , University of Gothenburg, ; Gothenburg, Sweden
                Contributors
                ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5924-6123, isabella.karlsson@aces.su.se
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                13 February 2018
                13 February 2018
                2018
                : 8
                21327
                10.1038/s41598-018-21327-8
                5811565
                29440696
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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