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      Speech Intelligibility in Adverse Conditions in Recorded Virtual Auditory Environments

      ,

      International Conference on Auditory Display '98 (AD)

      Auditory Display

      1-4 November 1998

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          Abstract

          The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of presentation mode on speech intelligibility in adverse listening conditions as signal-to-noise ratio was systematically varied in anechoic and reverberant environments. Speech intelligibility scores were obtained from 21 normally hearing listeners using a nonsense syllable test. The syllables were recorded in three environments (mono anechoic, spatial anechoic and spatial reverberant) at three SNR (0, 5, and 9dB) using two simultaneous interfering sound sources. The findings indicate (a) percent correct performance was about 40% lower with the traditional diotic presentation compared to a virtual presentation; (b) performance in the virtual reverberant was about 5% lower than in the virtual anechoic environment.

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          Most cited references 60

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          Headphone simulation of free-field listening. I: Stimulus synthesis.

          This article describes techniques used to synthesize headphone-presented stimuli that simulate the ear-canal waveforms produced by free-field sources. The stimulus synthesis techniques involve measurement of each subject's free-field-to-eardrum transfer functions for sources at a large number of locations in free field, and measurement of headphone-to-eardrum transfer functions with the subject wearing headphones. Digital filters are then constructed from the transfer function measurements, and stimuli are passed through these digital filters. Transfer function data from ten subjects and 144 source positions are described in this article, along with estimates of the various sources of error in the measurements. The free-field-to-eardrum transfer function data are consistent with comparable data reported elsewhere in the literature. A comparison of ear-canal waveforms produced by free-field sources with ear-canal waveforms produced by headphone-presented simulations shows that the simulations duplicate free-field waveforms within a few dB of magnitude and a few degrees of phase at frequencies up to 14 kHz.
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            Headphone simulation of free-field listening. II: Psychophysical validation.

             F Wightman,  A Kistler (1989)
            Listeners reported the apparent spatial positions of wideband noise bursts that were presented either by loudspeakers in free field or by headphones. The headphone stimuli were digitally processed with the aim of duplicating, at a listener's eardrums, the waveforms that were produced by the free-field stimuli. The processing algorithms were based on each subject's free-field-to-eardrum transfer functions that had been measured at 144 free-field source locations. The headphone stimuli were localized by eight subjects in virtually the same positions as the corresponding free-field stimuli. However, with headphone stimuli, there were more front-back confusions, and source elevation seemed slightly less well defined. One subject's difficulty with elevation judgments, which was observed both with free-field and with headphone stimuli, was traced to distorted features of the free-field-to-eardrum transfer function.
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              A review of the MTF concept in room acoustics and its use for estimating speech intelligibility in auditoria

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                November 1998
                November 1998
                : 1-13
                Affiliations
                U.S. Army Research Laboratory,

                Human Research and Engineering Directorate

                Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005
                Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University

                Nashville, Tennessee
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/AD1998.28
                © LTC Nancy L. Vause, Ph.D. et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. International Conference on Auditory Display '98, University of Glasgow, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                International Conference on Auditory Display '98
                AD
                University of Glasgow, UK
                1-4 November 1998
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Auditory Display
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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