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      Breaking bad news and managing family during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

      1 , 2
      Journal of Paramedic Practice
      Mark Allen Group

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          Breaking bad news education for emergency medicine residents: A novel training module using simulation with the SPIKES protocol

          Breaking bad news (BBN) in the emergency department (ED) is a common occurrence. This is especially true for an emergency physician (EP) as there is little time to prepare for the event and likely little or no knowledge of the patients or family background information. At our institution, there is no formal training for EP residents in delivering bad news. We felt teaching emergency medicine residents these communication skills should be an important part of their educational curriculum. We describe our experience with a defined educational program designed to educate and improve physician’s confidence and competence in bad news and death notification. A regularly scheduled 5-h grand rounds conference time frame was dedicated to the education of EM residents about BBN. A multidisciplinary approach was taken to broaden the prospective of the participants. The course included lectures from different specialties, role playing for three short scenarios in different capacities, and hi-fidelity simulation cases with volatile psychosocial issues and stressors. Participants were asked to fill out a self-efficacy form and evaluation sheets. Fourteen emergency residents participated and all thought that this education is necessary. The mean score of usefulness is 4.73 on a Likert Scale from 1 to 5. The simulation part was thought to be the most useful (43%), with role play 14%, and lecture 7%. We believe that teaching physicians to BBN in a controlled environment is a good use of educational time and an important procedure that EP must learn.
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            Psychological effect of witnessed resuscitation on bereaved relatives

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              Breaking bad news in China--the dilemma of patients' autonomy and traditional norms. A first communication skills training for Chinese oncologists and caretakers.

              Current practice of breaking bad news in China involves disclosure of information first to family members who then decide whether the patient should receive this information. Recently, however, patients' right to be informed has been regulated by law. This represents a dilemma for oncologists who now have to balance traditional practice with new legal requirements. A communication skills training (CST) was developed for Chinese practice. It addresses this issue and may help participants find individual solutions within these conflicting requirements. A first CST about breaking bad news took place at the Beijing Cancer Hospital, China, with 31 participants. We (i) assessed current practice, (ii) evaluated the workshop and (iii) self-assessed performance ratings about breaking bad news before and after the workshop with the help of questionnaires. (i) Participants stated that in most cases (78%), they inform family members first. Contrary to this practice, participants think that about 75% of patients would like to be informed first, independent of family. (ii) Overall, the workshop received a very good rating (M = 1.2; scale between 1 and 6). (iii) After the workshop, the participants rated their performance significantly higher in all areas, for example, talking about diagnosis, prognosis and death with the patient and the family. The CST showed high acceptance and led to significantly improved performance ratings of participating physicians in many areas. It helped participants deal with conflicting demands. For future trainings, further socio-cultural adaptations are needed. Obvious conflicts still exist and need to be resolved. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Paramedic Practice
                Journal of Paramedic Practice
                Mark Allen Group
                1759-1376
                2041-9457
                July 02 2018
                July 02 2018
                : 10
                : 7
                : 292-299
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Paramedic, North West Ambulance Service, Manchester
                [2 ]Senior Lecturer, Liverpool John Moore's University, Liverpool
                Article
                10.12968/jpar.2018.10.7.292
                42a08295-9b5e-497b-ba53-92953db2d892
                © 2018
                History

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