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      Prognostic role of neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio and platelet–lymphocyte ratio for hospital mortality in patients with AECOPD

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          Abstract

          Background and objectives

          Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is one of the leading causes of hospitalization and is associated with considerable mortality, for which clinicians are seeking useful and easily obtained biomarkers for prognostic evaluation. This study aimed to determine the potential role of the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR) as prognostic makers for hospital mortality in patients with AECOPD.

          Methods

          We included 303 patients with AECOPD in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics, NLR, PLR, and serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other data were collected. Relationships between NLR/PLR and CRP were evaluated by Pearson’s correlation test. Receiver operating characteristics curve and the area under the curve (AUC) were used to assess the ability of NLR and PLR to predict hospital mortality in patients with AECOPD.

          Results

          Mean levels of NLR and PLR of all patients with AECOPD were 7.92±8.79 and 207.21±148.47, respectively. NLR levels correlated with serum CRP levels ( r=0.281, P<0.05). The overall hospital mortality rate was 12.21% (37/303). Levels of NLR and PLR were signifi-cantly higher among non-survivors compared to survivors of AECOPD (both P<0.05). At a cut-off value of 6.24, the sensitivity and specificity of the NLR in predicting hospital mortality were 81.08% and 69.17%, respectively, with an AUC of 0.803. At a cut-off of 182.68, the corresponding sensitivity, specificity and AUC of PLR were 64.86%, 58.27%, and 0.639. The combination of NLR, PLR, and CRP increased the prognostic sensitivity.

          Conclusion

          NLR and PLR levels were increased in non-survivor patients with AECOPD, and the NLR may be simple and useful prognostic marker for hospital mortality in patients with AECOPD. More studies should be carried out to confirm our findings.

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          Most cited references 21

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2017
                03 August 2017
                : 12
                : 2285-2290
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yongchuan Hospital, Chongqing Medical University
                [2 ]Diabetes Department, Yongchuan Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital
                [3 ]Department of Critical Care Medicine, Yongchuan Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ze Tang, Department of Critical Care Medicine, Yongchuan Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No 439, Xuan Hua Lu, Yongchuan District, Chongqing 402160, China, Tel/fax +86 23 8538 1661, Email tangzemd@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                copd-12-2285
                10.2147/COPD.S141760
                5546734
                © 2017 Yao et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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