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      Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks and the Film/Television Divide

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      Open Library of Humanities

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          Abstract

          In 1992, the year David Lynch’s cult television series Twin Peaks was pulled off air, Lynch released the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, a prequel to the television series which filled in some of the gaps left from the series finale cliff-hanger. The film was received with unanimously negative reviews from critics and fans alike, condemning both its subtle and obvious deviations from the series and its inclusion of the character Laura Palmer, whose absence was a crucial narrative device at the centre of Twin Peaks. In film form, the Twin Peaks narrative suffers from thematic inconsistencies and aesthetic deviations. The scope of Twin Peaks seems much more capable in the setting of television and its gradual, episodic set-up. In recent years, however, with the announcement of a revival of the series, retrospective analysis of Fire Walk with Me has become more positive, and the film has also become an integral part of the overall Twin Peaks canon. Nevertheless, the transition from television to film in the case of Twin Peaks has remained a point of fan and scholarly controversy, with issues of continuity, narrative and aesthetics between the two different mediums continually being addressed and compared. In light of the news that the new season of Twin Peaks is set to be released in 2017, this article examines the significance of Fire Walk with Me as a cinematic counterpart and prequel to the original series, and how this has helped shape – whether positively or not – the overall narrative of Twin Peaks.

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          Most cited references30

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2056-6700
                Open Library of Humanities
                Open Library of Humanities
                2056-6700
                05 April 2017
                : 3
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The University of Technology, School of Communication, Sydney, AU
                Article
                10.16995/olh.89
                491181f3-c482-4e49-bdbf-58bfa9a2e262
                Copyright: © 2017 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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                Self URI (journal-page): https://olh.openlibhums.org/
                Categories
                From tv to screen

                Literary studies,Religious studies & Theology,Arts,Social & Behavioral Sciences,History,Philosophy

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