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      Oral health-related quality of life in Loeys-Dietz syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder: an observational cohort study

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          Abstract

          Background

          Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder whose oral manifestations and dental phenotypes have not been well-characterized. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of oral manifestations on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in LDS patients.

          Material and methods

          LDS subjects were assessed by the craniofacial team at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Dental Clinic between June 2015 and January 2018. Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire, oral health self-care behavior questionnaire and a comprehensive dental examination were completed for each subject. OHRQoL was assessed using the OHIP-14 questionnaire with higher scores corresponding to worse OHRQoL. Regression models were used to determine the relationship between each oral manifestation and the OHIP-14 scores using a level of significance of p ≤ 0.05.

          Results

          A total of 33 LDS subjects (51.5% female) aged 3–57 years (19.6 ± 15.1 years) were included in the study. The OHIP-14 scores ( n = 33) were significantly higher in LDS subjects (6.30 [SD 6.37]) when compared to unaffected family member subjects (1.50 [SD 2.28], p < 0.01), and higher than the previously reported scores of the general U.S. population (2.81 [SD 0.12]). Regarding oral health self-care behavior ( n = 32), the majority of LDS subjects reported receiving regular dental care (81%) and maintaining good-to-excellent daily oral hygiene (75%). Using a crude regression model, worse OHRQoL was found to be associated with dental hypersensitivity (β = 5.24; p < 0.05), temporomandibular joints (TMJ) abnormalities (β = 5.92; p < 0.01), self-reported poor-to-fair oral health status (β = 6.77; p < 0.01), and cumulation of four or more oral manifestations (β = 7.23; p < 0.001). Finally, using a parsimonious model, self-reported poor-to-fair oral health status (β = 5.87; p < 0.01) and TMJ abnormalities (β = 4.95; p < 0.01) remained significant.

          Conclusions

          The dental hypersensitivity, TMJ abnormalities, self-reported poor-to-fair oral health status and cumulation of four-or-more oral manifestations had significant influence on worse OHRQoL. Specific dental treatment guidelines are necessary to ensure optimal quality of life in patients diagnosed with LDS.

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          Most cited references 25

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          Research electronic data capture (REDCap)--a metadata-driven methodology and workflow process for providing translational research informatics support.

          Research electronic data capture (REDCap) is a novel workflow methodology and software solution designed for rapid development and deployment of electronic data capture tools to support clinical and translational research. We present: (1) a brief description of the REDCap metadata-driven software toolset; (2) detail concerning the capture and use of study-related metadata from scientific research teams; (3) measures of impact for REDCap; (4) details concerning a consortium network of domestic and international institutions collaborating on the project; and (5) strengths and limitations of the REDCap system. REDCap is currently supporting 286 translational research projects in a growing collaborative network including 27 active partner institutions.
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            Derivation and validation of a short-form oral health impact profile.

             Gary D Slade (1997)
            Growing recognition that quality of life is an important outcome of dental care has created a need for a range of instruments to measure oral health-related quality of life. This study aimed to derive a subset of items from the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49)-a 49-item questionnaire that measures people's perceptions of the impact of oral conditions on their well-being. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from an epidemiologic study of 1217 people aged 60+ years in South Australia. Internal reliability analysis, factor analysis and regression analysis were undertaken to derive a subset (OHIP-14) questionnaire and its validity was evaluated by assessing associations with sociodemographic and clinical oral status variables. Internal reliability of the OHIP-14 was evaluated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Regression analysis yielded an optimal set of 14 questions. The OHIP-14 accounted for 94% of variance in the OHIP-49; had high reliability (alpha = 0.88); contained questions from each of the seven conceptual dimensions of the OHIP-49; and had a good distribution of prevalence for individual questions. OHIP-14 scores and OHIP-49 scores displayed the same pattern of variation among sociodemographic groups of older adults. In a multivariate analysis of dentate people, eight oral status and sociodemographic variables were associated (P < 0.05) with both the OHIP-49 and the OHIP-14. While it will be important to replicate these findings in other populations, the findings suggest that the OHIP-14 has good reliability, validity and precision.
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              Loeys–Dietz syndrome: a primer for diagnosis and management

              Loeys–Dietz syndrome is a connective tissue disorder predisposing individuals to aortic and arterial aneurysms. Presenting with a wide spectrum of multisystem involvement, medical management for some individuals is complex. This review of literature and expert opinion aims to provide medical guidelines for care of individuals with Loeys–Dietz syndrome. Genet Med 16 8, 576–587.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                olivier.duverger@nih.gov
                janice.lee@nih.gov
                Journal
                Orphanet J Rare Dis
                Orphanet J Rare Dis
                Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
                BioMed Central (London )
                1750-1172
                16 December 2019
                16 December 2019
                2019
                : 14
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2205 0568, GRID grid.419633.a, Craniofacial Anomalies and Regeneration Section, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2205 0568, GRID grid.419633.a, Program Analysis and Reporting Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2164 9667, GRID grid.419681.3, Food Allergy Research Unit, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                Article
                1250
                10.1186/s13023-019-1250-y
                6915860
                31842932
                © The Author(s). 2019

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000072, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research;
                Award ID: ZIA DE000746 04 and ZID DE000728 10
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000060, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;
                Award ID: ZIA AI001203 04
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

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