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      How fibroblast growth factor 23 works.

      Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
      Animals, Bone and Bones, physiology, Fibroblast Growth Factors, genetics, metabolism, Humans, Hyperphosphatemia, physiopathology, Kidney, Mice

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          Abstract

          There is a discontinuum of hereditary and acquired disorders of phosphate homeostasis that are caused by either high or low circulating levels of the novel phosphaturic hormone fibroblastic growth factor 23 (FGF23). Disorders that are caused by high circulating levels of FGF23 are characterized by hypophosphatemia, decreased production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and rickets/osteomalacia. On the other end of the spectrum are disorders that are caused by low circulating levels of FGF23, which are characterized by hyperphosphatemia, elevated production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, soft tissue calcifications, and hyperostosis. Knowledge of the genetic basis of these hereditary disorders of phosphate homeostasis and studies of their mouse homologues have uncovered a bone-kidney axis and new systems biology that govern bone mineralization, vitamin D metabolism, parathyroid gland function, and renal phosphate handling. Further understanding of this primary phosphate homeostatic pathway has the potential to have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of bone and mineral metabolism.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          17494882
          10.1681/ASN.2007010068

          Chemistry
          Animals,Bone and Bones,physiology,Fibroblast Growth Factors,genetics,metabolism,Humans,Hyperphosphatemia,physiopathology,Kidney,Mice

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