Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Struggling for Survival: The Intricate Relationship between Poverty & Hiv/Aids In District Dir Lower, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

      , , , ,

      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Poverty a multifaceted phenomenon has been defined as hunger, deprivation, constrained choices and other interrelated features that impact upon the standard of living and quality of life of people. Poverty not only consists in the absence of financial capital but also includes an inability to access education, a doctor, information, social assets and skills. There has been a close association between poverty and HIV infection. HIV/AIDS is widely known around the world where the disease is destroying the lives and livelihood of tens of thousands of people. A major portion of infected people are found in developing countries like Pakistan The issue calls for the immediate attention of the research community because of its rapid spread in Pakistan. The current research was conducted with the objectives to identify the relationship between poverty and the spread of HIV/AIDS. The study applying a qualitative research approach was conducted in District Dir Lower, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Primary data was collected from fifteen (15) respondents through in-depth interview (using an interview guide) while the selection of the sample was made through non-probability sampling using a purposive sampling technique. Further, the research was analyzed qualitatively and a thematic discussion was made to clarify the issue under study. Research concluded that poverty and the spread of HIV/AIDS have close association and some remedies were also suggested in order to control the spread of the disease.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 5

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Vulnerability to malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS infection and disease. Part 1: determinants operating at individual and household level.

          A high burden of malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV infection contributes to national and individual poverty. We have reviewed a broad range of evidence detailing factors at individual, household, and community levels that influence vulnerability to malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV infection and used this evidence to identify strategies that could improve resilience to these diseases. This first part of the review explores the concept of vulnerability to infectious diseases and examines how age, sex, and genetics can influence the biological response to malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV infection. We highlight factors that influence processes such as poverty, livelihoods, gender discrepancies, and knowledge acquisition and provide examples of how approaches to altering these processes may have a simultaneous effect on all three diseases.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Incubation period of AIDS in San Francisco.

             P Bacchetti,  A Moss (1989)
            In a closed population, the distribution of AIDS diagnoses over time is the convolution of the distributions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the incubation period. This has motivated estimates of the infection distribution, assuming known diagnosis and incubation distributions, but the usefulness of this method is limited by uncertainty about incubation. The large amount of information on the distribution of HIV infections in San Francisco's gay community suggests the opposite approach--estimating the incubation distribution, assuming known infection and diagnosis distributions. A non-parametric implementation of this strategy produced an estimate with a median at 9.8 years, increasing hazard rates, and less uncertainty than previous estimates.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The Social and Cultural Contexts of HIV/AIDS Transmission in the Kagera Region Tanzania

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                cswhi
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                July 30 2019
                June 28 2019
                July 30 2019
                June 28 2019
                : 10
                : 2
                : 101-109
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_10_2_13
                © 2019

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

                Comments

                Comment on this article