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      Language, Theory of Mind and Autism Therapy

      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          This paper presents an overview of the literature regarding autism and role of language in the process of therapy with the autistic children and adults. The overview of the literature shows the importance of two factors: the use of syntactic structures and understanding of Theory of Mind tasks. The role of the language in the process of therapy of autistic children and adults is discussed.

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          Most cited references 7

          • Record: found
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          Neural systems for speech and song in autism

          Despite language disabilities in autism, music abilities are frequently preserved. Paradoxically, brain regions associated with these functions typically overlap, enabling investigation of neural organization supporting speech and song in autism. Neural systems sensitive to speech and song were compared in low-functioning autistic and age-matched control children using passive auditory stimulation during functional magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging. Activation in left inferior frontal gyrus was reduced in autistic children relative to controls during speech stimulation, but was greater than controls during song stimulation. Functional connectivity for song relative to speech was also increased between left inferior frontal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus in autism, and large-scale connectivity showed increased frontal–posterior connections. Although fractional anisotropy of the left arcuate fasciculus was decreased in autistic children relative to controls, structural terminations of the arcuate fasciculus in inferior frontal gyrus were indistinguishable between autistic and control groups. Fractional anisotropy correlated with activity in left inferior frontal gyrus for both speech and song conditions. Together, these findings indicate that in autism, functional systems that process speech and song were more effectively engaged for song than for speech and projections of structural pathways associated with these functions were not distinguishable from controls.
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            Longitudinal patterns of behaviour problems in children with specific speech and language difficulties: child and contextual factors.

            The purpose of this study was to examine the stability of behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD) in children with specific speech and language difficulties (SSLD), and the relationship between BESD and the language ability. A sample of children with SSLD were assessed for BESD at ages 8, 10 and 12 years by both teachers and parents. Language abilities were assessed at 8 and 10 years. High levels of BESD were found at all three ages but with different patterns of trajectories for parents' and teachers' ratings. Language ability predicted teacher- but not parent-rated BESD. The study confirms the persistence of high levels of BESD over the period 8-12 years and the continuing comorbidity of BESD and language difficulties but also indicates a complex interaction of within-child and contextual factors over time.
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              Language and theory of mind in autism spectrum disorder: the relationship between complement syntax and false belief task performance.

              This study aimed to test the hypothesis that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use their knowledge of complement syntax as a means of "hacking out" solutions to false belief tasks, despite lacking a representational theory of mind (ToM). Participants completed a "memory for complements" task, a measure of receptive vocabulary, and traditional location change and unexpected contents false belief tasks. Consistent with predictions, the correlation between complement syntax score and location change task performance was significantly stronger within the ASD group than within the comparison group. However, contrary to predictions, complement syntax score was not significantly correlated with unexpected contents task performance within either group. Possible explanations for this pattern of results are considered.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                cswhi
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                : 9
                : 2
                : 7-13
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_9_2_01
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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