Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      How do Hospice Patients Feel about Hospice Care - and is It Important? Exploring the Relationship between Patient Attitude to Hospice Care, Survival and other Patient Characteristics in the Setting of First Croatian Hospice (Original paper)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective: To research the relationship between the initial attitude of hospice patients towards hospice care and different patient characteristics. Design: Retrospective chart review. Participants: 433 consecutive patients with the determined attitude towards hospice care, in the first Croatian hospice, the Marija K. Kozulić from March 2013 to March 2016. Methods: We evaluated the relationship between patient attitude towards hospice care and characteristics such as age, gender, marital status, level of education, the presence of cancer, performance status, initial and final opioid dose, the use of anxiolytics and antipsychotics, fluid intakes, participation in physiotherapy, discharge status and survival in hospice. Results: Patients were divided into four different groups based on their attitude towards hospice care: acceptance, rejection or anger, depression, bargaining or adapting, and uninformed or partially informed. Our research shows that the majority of patients (69%) has a positive attitude towards hospice. There were no significant differences regarding age, gender, marital status, as well as survival and discharge status between the groups. However, patients exhibiting depression, bargaining or adapting had significantly higher opioid doses in therapy (on average, 145.8 mg OME/day), and the highest elevation of opioid doses during their stay (on average, 52 mg OME/day) compared to other groups. Conclusion: Most patients have a positive attitude towards hospice care. However, the differences in attitude might not influence the length of survival or discharge percentage. However, patients exhibiting depression, bargaining or adapting might be in risk of over-treatment with opioids and could potentially gain significant benefits from the addition of anti-depressants, or sessions with a psychologist.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Older adults' attitudes to death, palliative treatment and hospice care.

          Cancer patients who receive care from specialist palliative care services in the UK are younger than those who do not receive this care. This may be explained by age-related differences in attitudes to end-of-life care. To determine the relationship between age and i) attitudes to death and preparation for death; and ii) knowledge about, and attitudes to, cancer and palliative care. Interviews with older people, using a novel questionnaire developed using nominal groups. Main comparisons were made between people aged 55-74 with those aged 75 years and over. General practices in London. 129 people aged 55-74 and 127 people aged 75 years or over on the lists of general practitioners. A cross-sectional survey to determine knowledge and experience of hospice care; preparation for end-of-life; and attitudes to end-of-life issues. Participants were knowledgeable about specialist palliative care and almost half had some indirect contact with a hospice. People aged >74 were less likely than younger participants to want their doctor to end their life in a terminal illness. Although they believed death was easier to face for older people, they did not believe that younger people deserved more consideration than older people when dying, or that they should have priority for hospice care. Education, social class, hospice knowledge and anxiety about death had little influence on overall attitudes. The relative under-utilization of hospice and specialist palliative care services by older people with cancer in the UK cannot be explained by their attitudes to end-of-life issues and palliative care.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Perspective of patients patients' families and healthcare providers towards designing and delivering hospice care services in a middle income Country

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Management of pain in cancer patients with depression and cognitive deterioration

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                CSWHI
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                December 28 2017
                December 28 2017
                : 8
                : 4
                : 53-60
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_8_4_06
                © 2017

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

                Comments

                Comment on this article