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      Efficient high-order analysis of bowtie nanoantennas using the locally corrected Nystrom method

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          Abstract

          It is demonstrated that the Locally Corrected Nystrom (LCN) method is a versatile and numerically efficient computational method for the modeling of scattering from plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas. The LCN method is a high-order analysis method that can provide exponential convergence. It is straightforward to implement, accurate and computationally efficient. To the best of the authors knowledge, the high-order LCN is here applied for the first time to 3D nanostructures. Numerical results show the accuracy and efficiency of the LCN applied to the electromagnetic analysis of nanostructures.

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          Optical Constants of the Noble Metals

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            Antennas for light

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              Electromagnetic fields around silver nanoparticles and dimers.

              We use the discrete dipole approximation to investigate the electromagnetic fields induced by optical excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles, including monomers and dimers, with emphasis on what size, shape, and arrangement leads to the largest local electric field (E-field) enhancement near the particle surfaces. The results are used to determine what conditions are most favorable for producing enhancements large enough to observe single molecule surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Most of the calculations refer to triangular prisms, which exhibit distinct dipole and quadrupole resonances that can easily be controlled by varying particle size. In addition, for the dimer calculations we study the influence of dimer separation and orientation, especially for dimers that are separated by a few nanometers. We find that the largest /E/2 values for dimers are about a factor of 10 larger than those for all the monomers examined. For all particles and particle orientations, the plasmon resonances which lead to the largest E-fields are those with the longest wavelength dipolar excitation. The spacing of the particles in the dimer plays a crucial role, and we find that the spacing needed to achieve a given /E/2 is proportional to nanoparticle size for particles below 100 nm in size. Particle shape and curvature are of lesser importance, with a head to tail configuration of two triangles giving enhanced fields comparable to head to head, or rounded head to tail. The largest /E/2 values we have calculated for spacings of 2 nm or more is approximately 10(5). (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2016-11-29
                Article
                10.1364/OE.23.031452
                1611.09649
                5a33a4ee-4119-4810-b3c4-da647a4487c3

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

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                Optics Express 2015
                physics.optics

                Optical materials & Optics

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