Blog
About

256
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    8
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Arlequin suite ver 3.5: a new series of programs to perform population genetics analyses under Linux and Windows

      ,

      Molecular Ecology Resources

      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We present here a new version of the Arlequin program available under three different forms: a Windows graphical version (Winarl35), a console version of Arlequin (arlecore), and a specific console version to compute summary statistics (arlsumstat). The command-line versions run under both Linux and Windows. The main innovations of the new version include enhanced outputs in XML format, the possibility to embed graphics displaying computation results directly into output files, and the implementation of a new method to detect loci under selection from genome scans. Command-line versions are designed to handle large series of files, and arlsumstat can be used to generate summary statistics from simulated data sets within an Approximate Bayesian Computation framework. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 8

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Detection of reduction in population size using data from microsatellite loci.

          We demonstrate that the mean ratio of the number of alleles to the range in allele size, which we term M, calculated from a population sample of microsatellite loci, can be used to detect reductions in population size. Using simulations, we show that, for a general class of mutation models, the value of M decreases when a population is reduced in size. The magnitude of the decrease is positively correlated with the severity and duration of the reduction in size. We also find that the rate of recovery of M following a reduction in size is positively correlated with post-reduction population size, but that recovery occurs in both small and large populations. This indicates that M can distinguish between populations that have been recently reduced in size and those which have been small for a long time. We employ M to develop a statistical test for recent reductions in population size that can detect such changes for more than 100 generations with the post-reduction demographic scenarios we examine. We also compute M for a variety of populations and species using microsatellite data collected from the literature. We find that the value of M consistently predicts the reported demographic history for these populations. This method, and others like it, promises to be an important tool for the conservation and management of populations that are in need of intervention or recovery.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Statistical evaluation of alternative models of human evolution.

            An appropriate model of recent human evolution is not only important to understand our own history, but it is necessary to disentangle the effects of demography and selection on genome diversity. Although most genetic data support the view that our species originated recently in Africa, it is still unclear if it completely replaced former members of the Homo genus, or if some interbreeding occurred during its range expansion. Several scenarios of modern human evolution have been proposed on the basis of molecular and paleontological data, but their likelihood has never been statistically assessed. Using DNA data from 50 nuclear loci sequenced in African, Asian and Native American samples, we show here by extensive simulations that a simple African replacement model with exponential growth has a higher probability (78%) as compared with alternative multiregional evolution or assimilation scenarios. A Bayesian analysis of the data under this best supported model points to an origin of our species approximately 141 thousand years ago (Kya), an exit out-of-Africa approximately 51 Kya, and a recent colonization of the Americas approximately 10.5 Kya. We also find that the African replacement model explains not only the shallow ancestry of mtDNA or Y-chromosomes but also the occurrence of deep lineages at some autosomal loci, which has been formerly interpreted as a sign of interbreeding with Homo erectus.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              ABCtoolbox: a versatile toolkit for approximate Bayesian computations

              Background The estimation of demographic parameters from genetic data often requires the computation of likelihoods. However, the likelihood function is computationally intractable for many realistic evolutionary models, and the use of Bayesian inference has therefore been limited to very simple models. The situation changed recently with the advent of Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) algorithms allowing one to obtain parameter posterior distributions based on simulations not requiring likelihood computations. Results Here we present ABCtoolbox, a series of open source programs to perform Approximate Bayesian Computations (ABC). It implements various ABC algorithms including rejection sampling, MCMC without likelihood, a Particle-based sampler and ABC-GLM. ABCtoolbox is bundled with, but not limited to, a program that allows parameter inference in a population genetics context and the simultaneous use of different types of markers with different ploidy levels. In addition, ABCtoolbox can also interact with most simulation and summary statistics computation programs. The usability of the ABCtoolbox is demonstrated by inferring the evolutionary history of two evolutionary lineages of Microtus arvalis. Using nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial sequence data in the same estimation procedure enabled us to infer sex-specific population sizes and migration rates and to find that males show smaller population sizes but much higher levels of migration than females. Conclusion ABCtoolbox allows a user to perform all the necessary steps of a full ABC analysis, from parameter sampling from prior distributions, data simulations, computation of summary statistics, estimation of posterior distributions, model choice, validation of the estimation procedure, and visualization of the results.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                MEN
                Molecular Ecology Resources
                Wiley
                1755098X
                17550998
                May 2010
                May 2010
                : 10
                : 3
                : 564-567
                Article
                10.1111/j.1755-0998.2010.02847.x
                21565059
                © 2010

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Comments

                Comment on this article